Wuyi Ensemble

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Grapes, Grass, Ash
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Jacob B
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 30 sec 2 g 10 oz / 296 ml

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58 Tasting Notes View all

From Adagio Teas

Oolong tea from the Wuyi mountains in the Fujian province of China. Wuyi Oolong grows defiantly in the gaps of the mountainous rock, rendering cultivation both arduous and spell-bindingly beautiful. This tea is famous for its ’dragonfly’s head, frog’s limbs and three colors.’ The latter refers to the green, red and brown colors found in the cross-section of each leaf. Similar to other fine oolong teas, the ‘Wuyi Ensemble’ may be infused a number of times, with each infusion revealing a new nuance of this tea’s complex flavor.

$10/1.5 oz

About Adagio Teas View company

Adagio Teas has become one of the most popular destinations for tea online. Its products are available online at www.adagio.com and in many gourmet and health food stores.

58 Tasting Notes

80
517 tasting notes

Happy New Year! Still trying to sip down some older teas in the next few months, I think, and then I can go back and restock my favorites/try new things. I’ve pared down my collection by nearly half already in three months or so (wow!), so I’m nearly there! I can’t wait.

My review of this last time was accurate; I taste different things with each sip, and I think that makes it good for a new year. At the very least I find that roasty, woody quality soothing on a cold day after staying up too late. I get more of the fruitiness this time around, almost like something dried (prunes?). As always, I really do like Adagio’s oolongs. They surprise me, which is not something their other teas do.

Jennkay

I admire your ability to pare down your teas. I need to get better at that! Haha

bluebelle

As long as you’re not overwhelmed, you’re probably fine! I had way too many samples of things but now I’m nearly down to just full sizes.

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79
117 tasting notes

Nice, although I think I need to switch to decaf now…

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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85
19 tasting notes

This tea is definitely one of my favorites from Adagio. It was also my first WuYi oolong. Might I say, what a pleasant experience!

I got 2-3 good cups out of this stuff, which is good for the price IMO. The first and second cup yielded that mineral, rocky flavor with some sort of fruitiness. I can’t quite put my finger on it — perhaps lychee? Anyway, the fruitiness was somewhat prominent and added to the complexity. There was also a nice, lingering aftertaste.

The second cup didn’t quite have as prominent of a fruitiness, but a lot of sweetness came out paired with the rocky taste. On the third cup, things started to quiet down as a whole.

Interestingly, I used about 2 tsp. / 8 oz. of water, and my first two steepings were at 1 minute each. I wonder if I should have steeped them for longer? Oh well, only time will tell when I obtain more.

All in all, this tea is very refreshing, in the sense of its unique flavor and just how the aftertaste coats your throat. While I want to explore more WuYis, I don’t want to stray too far from this one!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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81
8 tasting notes

In the pouch: Not as much smell as some of the other teas. Almost an odd, plastic odor that I have to blame on the packaging, actually, so not much from the tea so far.

Steeping: Nutty, smoky scent that gets stronger.

Drinking: Light and nutty with a faint smokiness. This is actually my favorite non-flavored oolong so far from this box of samples. I think I’ll be doing at least one more steep, and there might be a tin of this in my future.

Preparation
4 min, 0 sec

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71
20 tasting notes

Not one of my favorites from Adagio’s oolong lineup. It is a fairly balanced oolong, but I tend to prefer the greener lightly oxidized varieties better. Still I would say it is above-average quality.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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90
18 tasting notes

When I first tried this tea, I was unimpressed. The woody flavor wasn’t, er, my cup of tea. One the second steeping of these leaves, however, I was very pleased to find a balanced cup of delicious tea! A few days later, I tried steeping dry leaf again, this time making sure to awaken the leaves by pouring boiling water over them and discarding this first brew. Upon drinking my tea, a bright smile spread across my face as notes of honey and pecans hit my senses. While a dash of sugar was nice, this tea is really special all on its own. Just awesome tea! Definitely one of my favorites.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 45 sec

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95
337 tasting notes

My daughter thought this tea smells like rain water, my husband said it smells a little bit like chocolate and I thought it smells like hay/grass/ grains/barley. The leaves look beautiful: dark and twisted. Taste: nutty/grainy/hearty. Turns out I like Wuyi teas…
Leaving for vacation tomorrow, will be completely unplugged for a week but I will take some tea with me, that’s for sure.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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88
224 tasting notes

A stronger wuyi oolong than the others that I’ve had before. It has a nice medium roast with a bit of a slightly smoky nutty notes to the overall earthy sweetness.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec

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75
7 tasting notes

Interesting. This has a very nice color, very large leaves. Upon drinking, it has a very strange, tight mouthfeel: not smooth; astringent, but also there is something else, a brightness under the soft palate which wanes with later steepings. It has a warm flavor, very unique, which occurs nearly entirely in the back of the mouth: nutty, not sweet, not black, not green; I would almost say sour. That’s not bad though; it’s only the typical complexity of oolongs; it’s a flavor not to be simply taken, but explored. (The flavor cools and dims with later steepings, picking up more sweetness and a floral note.) It certainly has me thinking of a rainy day in the mountains.

Preparation: I’ve done it a few ways but I think I like this most recent way the best: A tablespoon and a pinch of tea per four to six ounces of water, just under boiling, for 1, 1, 2, 4, and 8 minutes.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C

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83
49 tasting notes

I’m finding there is definitely a “first taste” bias, among tea tastings. It’s probably the case for everyone: most teas taste best when you tried it the first time. This applies to food as well.

From the look of the leaves, I expected it to taste like Lapsang Souchong, but it was nothing like. I was surprised how similar this one was to Tie Guan Yin. Hard to say how it is similar/different. Seems more nuanced and complex flavors than TGY. Less “refreshing” than TGY. Isn’t as overpowering with the caffeine as TGY. Definitely an Oolong. More on the green side than black in terms of taste and color of liquid.

Flavors: Grapes, Grass

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 5 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 10 OZ / 295 ML

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