Organic Silver Needle White Tea

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Jason
Average preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “No matter how hard I try I cannot get myself that interested in plain white tea (but yes, I keep trying) The first time I brewed this I let it steep too long which was definitely a mistake....” Read full tasting note
    80
    amyoh2 2340 tasting notes

From Arbor Teas

Our organic Silver Needle White Tea is among the most revered of Chinese teas, produced in the high mountains of China’s southeastern Fujian province. This tea consists of only the most delicate downy buds from the tea plant’s newest growth. Gathered only in the few days of early spring, the preparation of this tea is governed by strict requirements to ensure a truly premium product. This dedication to perfection is evident in the cup. The pale yellow infusion has a rich, nectar-like body. It yields a light, honey-sweet fragrance with a delicate sweetness and smooth, clean finish. This tea is absolutely devoid of astringency.

About Arbor Teas View company

We’re tea enthusiasts with a lot of passion. Passion for top quality tea, the environment, fair trade, and our community. We started Arbor Teas in Ann Arbor, Michigan, intent on creating a tea company as passionate as we are. Our passion is reflected in every aspect of Arbor Teas. You’ll certainly notice it in the exceptional collection of teas we offer - one of the largest catalogs of USDA certified organic teas around, nearly three-quarters of which are Fair Trade Certified®.

2 Tasting Notes

80
2340 tasting notes

No matter how hard I try I cannot get myself that interested in plain white tea (but yes, I keep trying)

The first time I brewed this I let it steep too long which was definitely a mistake. Steeping in cooled water for around 60 seconds seemed to yield the best results. It is sweet, and delicate and light but I think perhaps the subtle nature of white tea is kind of lost on me. This was a pleasant cup but I really prefer flavored white tea if I am going to drink it…. sorry purists!

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 1 min, 0 sec
ScottTeaMan

If you drink alot of black teas, I can understand how it gets lost on you. I think before I tried Whites, I was into greens during the summer. Then I found a bag of Shou Mei White that I had stashed away. This was the perfect white to transition to, b/c ithad slightly deeper toasty aspects to it. Plus I prepared it Gongfu using more tea and shorter steeps. So I was drinking that, & then went on to lighter whites. I really like them, but drink them mostly in the summertime.

ScottTeaMan

Flavored whites can be good as long as the flavoring isn’t too much & masks the tea.

ScottTeaMan

I think it was Shou Mei, or it may have been Bai Mu Dan.

TeaBrat

perhaps I will try again in the summer…

Jim Marks

One big problem with white teas is how delicate they are. If you do not prepare the tea in precisely the correct manner, much of the flavor is lost, resulting in a bland, boring cup.

For this reason I tend to avoid white teas — the risk/reward is too skewed.

But prepared correctly they can be absolutely full flavored. It just takes a lot of dialing in to get them just right.

Auggy

I’ve never had much luck with white teas, either. Too often they taste like vegetable water to me, so not my thing. (The one unflavored exception being Chicago Tea Garden’s Silver Needle – it gave me delightful nectar and sweetness.) But hey, if I managed to find one unflavored white tea that I liked, I bet you will too!

TeaBrat

cold brewing might be a good way to bring out their flavors…?

ScottTeaMan

Jim-I have to dial in most of my teas to get them right.

Amy:

I’ve never cold brewed a white tea, but you’d probably have to use double the leaf when doing so (or nearly so). I’d use a Pai Mu Tan white, something a little bolder:

http://uptontea.com/shopcart/item.asp?from=catalog.asp&itemID=ZW55&begin=0&parent=Teas%3EWhite%3EChina&category=White&sortMethod=0&categoryID=59

http://uptontea.com/shopcart/item.asp?from=catalog.asp&itemID=ZW56&begin=0&parent=Teas%3EWhite%3EChina&category=White&sortMethod=0&categoryID=59

http://uptontea.com/shopcart/item.asp?from=catalog.asp&itemID=ZW58&begin=0&parent=Teas%3EWhite%3EChina&category=White&sortMethod=0&categoryID=59

I think a Pai Mu Tan is better for cold brew or hot if you’re looking for a fuller white. Read the customer reviews too, they may help you as well. Hope this helps— :))

TeaBrat

Thanks fore the advice Scott. I think I should just give up and stop spending my money on white tea. ;-)

Charles Thomas Draper

Jim is correct. You have to add more leaf….

ScottTeaMan

Maybe with my next order, I’ll buy some Pai Mu Tan and send you some!

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