2009 Langhe TF Menghai Ripe Mini "Chen Xiang" Fang Zhuan

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Yang-chu
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 min, 0 sec

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “This very rich Langhe mini is called "Chen Xiang," meaning tangerine flavored. I can't tell. What I can notice, however, is that it is a solid quality pu-er, very rich tasting that takes about...” Read full tasting note
    86
    Yang-chu 25 tasting notes

From Cha Wang Shop

This small square ripe puerh is made of Menghai unbroken sun-dried and fermented large leaves material. Brewed tea have deep red brown color. Mild and sweet. “Chen Xiang” (陈香) means “the smells that develop with ageing”.

Langhe TF used good quality and tasty material to make all small size ripe products . Small size puerh teas are very good and appropriate packaging for trip. This product come with small jute pack.

“Green Food” certificed organic product

About Cha Wang Shop View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

86
25 tasting notes

This very rich Langhe mini is called “Chen Xiang,” meaning tangerine flavored. I can’t tell. What I can notice, however, is that it is a solid quality pu-er, very rich tasting that takes about 40oz of water to be become cashed. The cha-qi is in the 7 range, on a scale to 10.

This mini has a certain fullness that isn’t usually the case with minis. It’s an excellent product for those seeking to expand their pu-er repertoire, despite the absence of any tangerine flavor. Feels really good going down, especially on chilly days.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 min, 0 sec
sansnipple

Pretty sure Chen Xiang means “aged aroma”, nothing to do with tangerines.

Yang-chu

you know you’re probably right, “陈” refers to both old and tangerine and being an herbalist, I just assumed that the chen was referring to the latter.
just looked it up and "’Chen Xiang’ (陈香) means ‘the smells that develop with ageing’. "
When I’ve seen other chen described cakes I never associated it with tangerine, but I must have been trippin’ in this case. Very good cake all the same. Thanks for the correction.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.