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Silver Needle

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by K S
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1 Tasting Note View all

  • “Spring 2013 Fuding leaf. Looking at the picture you can see this is exquisite to gaze upon. The dry aroma greets you the moment the bag is open. It is sweet hay. Once steeped the leaf turns shiny...” Read full tasting note
    ks6 1160 tasting notes

From Concept Teas

Silver Needle (Bai Hao Yin Zhen in Chinese) is considered as the top grade white tea for its rarity and legendary health benefits. Its name comes from the appearance – tippy all over, needle-shaped and with “shimmering” pure silver color. The top quality Silver Needle is from the first terminal bud, of which the picking season is limited to only a couple of days during early spring (usually before Qingming Festival), when the buds are fresh and bold but not open yet. After spring, the newborn buds are mostly lateral and leaner. There are also some criteria for choosing an ideal day for picking, namely “sunny and lower humidity days preferred” while “rainy or foggy days avoided”. The terminal buds can be picked up alone. Alternatively, they can be picked up as “one bud with one leaf” or “one bud with two leaves”, and then separated afterwards. Historically as royal tribute, Silver Needle nowadays, especially the top grade, is still short of worldwide demand for its geographic exclusivity and limit production volume. It is sometimes used as the “embellishment” in blended tea to “improve” the grade.

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1 Tasting Note

1160 tasting notes

Spring 2013 Fuding leaf. Looking at the picture you can see this is exquisite to gaze upon. The dry aroma greets you the moment the bag is open. It is sweet hay. Once steeped the leaf turns shiny pea green with a scent that is vegetal and earthy. The liquor is honey yellow. The sip is sweet, hay and light earthiness. Late in the sip it develops light melon notes. The sweet aftertaste lingers long after the tea is gone. As the cup cooled it took on more of citrus profile that I found appealing. I prepared this in a gaiwan and a press. I preferred the press method. The dance of the leaf enchants me and honestly I thought the flavor was more developed in the press.

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