Qi Hong Mao Feng

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Traveling Shrine
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 30 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Brewing this tea in a gaiwan with hot water for a very short time (gong Fu style) is a luxury. I did about 10 second infusions and the flavor is so chocolatey and rich, the aroma brimming with...” Read full tasting note
    79
    sirbrillig 108 tasting notes
  • “Most of the time when brewing black tea for myself at home, I tend to use my zhong and take as many infusions as I can get. I decided to just make a pot of this for two reasons. 1 being I didn't...” Read full tasting note
    83
    benyoungbaer 108 tasting notes
  • “I've become quite a fan of brewing the finer black teas of China with zhongs and not filters. In such a small vessel, the leaves seem to fill the entire space with their burgeoning flavors, and...” Read full tasting note
    86
    changeangeling 17 tasting notes

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3 Tasting Notes

79
108 tasting notes

Brewing this tea in a gaiwan with hot water for a very short time (gong Fu style) is a luxury. I did about 10 second infusions and the flavor is so chocolatey and rich, the aroma brimming with hints of coffee beans. The liquer is red-gold, just like the glowing wet leaves. At the moment the tea fills the mouth there is also a roasted chestnut quality to it that draws you in. I’m on infusion two and I suspect I will get many more to come!

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C

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83
108 tasting notes

Most of the time when brewing black tea for myself at home, I tend to use my zhong and take as many infusions as I can get. I decided to just make a pot of this for two reasons. 1 being I didn’t have the time to sit around and steep all morning. 2 being I recently had a done multiple infusions with Qi Hong and the flavor died off really quickly after the first cup. So here’s the deal, this tea is very chocolaty. like a dark chocolate bar aromatizing your cup and the air around it. while not as dark as Dian Hong, this is dark enough for most and a nice tea for the afternoon or with a light snack or after a big meal.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 2 min, 30 sec

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86
17 tasting notes

I’ve become quite a fan of brewing the finer black teas of China with zhongs and not filters. In such a small vessel, the leaves seem to fill the entire space with their burgeoning flavors, and more infusions can be gained with a quicker and more surprising succession of brews.
Late afternoon awakener, for the days when one wishes to linger in sleep. Notes of bittersweet cacao paired with the deep satin texture of this tea makes any gray day luxurious. I read somewhere that Qi Men means “Great Gate,” the energy of opening.
A Ganesha tea, obstructions and limits clear away under its influence.
3 min, if using a teapot, or by intuition via zhong ;-)

Traveling Shrine

Forgot to mention, but accompanying this tea with cacao-like delicacies is a sure-fire route to supreme bliss. Sensual Enlightenment!!!! I had it with a cacao-blue green algae Wildbar and Maca-Manna butter……………..no further words possible!

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