The Original Ti Kuan Yin Honey Aroma 30% Roasted

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by the_skua
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

2 Want it Want it

1 Own it Own it

3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “A year after, my perception of this tea has shift much, as I have gained considerably experience since the trip I took to Fang last January. I went through a period of brewing this tea badly, under...” Read full tasting note
    86
    the_skua 207 tasting notes

From Fang Gourmet Tea

Ti Kuan Yin can either mean a variety of a Oolong tea tree or a unique production method. For a tea to be called Original Ti Kuan Yin, it must fulfill the two aforementioned aspects. The tea tree produces much less leaves than other varieties and is more difficult to maintain. The production method is complicated as the tea leaves must be repeatedly rolled and cloth twisted and then charcoal roasted for several days.

The tea of the Ti Kuan Yin carries a dense ripe fruit aroma and has a clear amber color. Each sip of the tea is rich and full-bodied. It starts off slightly bitter and astringent but then transforms into being dry sweet. Also, it has a slight citrus taste that lingers in the drinker’s throat. The tea’s honey aroma stays at the bottom of the cup and allows the drinker to experience the tea over and over again.
Weight: 150g

About Fang Gourmet Tea View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

86
207 tasting notes

A year after, my perception of this tea has shift much, as I have gained considerably experience since the trip I took to Fang last January. I went through a period of brewing this tea badly, under poor conditions and not being deliberate or considerate about the process. Now, at home, with time, this tea again breathes many of the flavors I originally appreciate it for. Currants, gingseng, buckwheat honey, cranberries, and chervil. I also know now that it’s not quite as good as I once thought it to be, but that it’s still a respectable roasted oolong, although perhaps, not at its going price.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.