Kekecha Yellow

Tea type
Yellow Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Cofftea
Average preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 3 min, 15 sec

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “2.25g/6oz purified water. The raw leaves are so pretty! Some are twisted and others are so scrunched they almost look like they're rolled. The liquor is a lot darker than I expected. Other than...” Read full tasting note
    75
    Cofftea 865 tasting notes

From Fava Tea Co.

Organic, World Tea Champion. Yellow tea is traditionally only-half partially-fermented, and is comparable to Oolong tea. During production, the experienced tea master must rely on instinct in order to stop the oxidation process at exactly the right moment. Due to its stimulating effect and its many pleasant qualities, consumption of this tea remained a privilege of the Buddhist monks for a long time.

Our quality has an open, multicolored leaf with bronze, golden-brown and green shades similar to White Peony. The cup color offers a unique kaleidoscope of colors in apricot. The taste is mild with a hint of papaya and underlying spiciness.

Recommendations: 1 heaping tea spoons per 6 oz. cup; heat fresh water until it is steaming briskly (not boiling); let steep for 2 min. Able to steep multiple time.

Health Benefits: Studies show that white/yellow tea is loaded with antioxidants; it can protect against cancer, heart disease and stroke, as well as numerous other conditions. White tea is also said to strengthen the circulatory and healthy, young looking skin.

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5 Tasting Notes

75
865 tasting notes

2.25g/6oz purified water. The raw leaves are so pretty! Some are twisted and others are so scrunched they almost look like they’re rolled. The liquor is a lot darker than I expected. Other than that I can’t tell you much cuz I’m still sick. Although I gave it a pretty high score because I could actually taste it a bit inspite of my cold.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 3 min, 0 sec
EvaPeva

I want to try this one. . .

Cofftea

www.favatea.com For some reason it isn’t in their on-line catalog so just give them a call. They’re great!

EvaPeva

Maybe they ran out? teasmecafe.com has an intriguing description of this tea. . .a Buddhist Monk Specialty!

Cofftea

No, cuz I looked for it as soon as I came home on Monday after buying it so I could put a discription in the tea profile. They still have it, but I know they’re going to discontinue it and replace it w/ another yellow (they used to have 2 on their website) so maybe that’s why.

Cofftea

Thanks for looking for a discription!:)

EvaPeva

ya, i was curious! First I wanted to know what Kind of tea this was. . . cuz it sounded like an Oolong. . .and now i must have some!

Cofftea

2nd infusion, 4 min. Liquor is a redish brown, almost clay in color. And I think it’s a bit sweeter… I think… hard to tell w/ this dang cold.

EvaPeva

what temp. do you use? I usually keep mine low for most teas. .

Cofftea

My log says 180 cuz that’s what the tea shop recommends.

Cofftea

3rd infusion 5 min. It’s not really weaker, more mellow I’d call it. But then again what do I know when it comes to being able to taste tea today?

Cofftea

4th infusion, 6 min. I’m more sure of the increasing sweetness now.

EvaPeva

do you keep all of these at a constant 180?? . . hope you feel better soon :)

Cofftea

5th and 6th infusions, 7 and 8 min. I have no clue why they call this yellow tea. The raw leaves are brown and green, the wet leaves are green, and the liquor is reddish brown.

Keemun

…personally I am not very fond of yellow tea. To mild for my taste…I am surprised that you get so much infusions out of one portion…YOU…the most demanding tea drinker that I ever had the pleasure to come across…;-)
Must have been very fresh leafs then…I guess

Cofftea

Demanding? How do you mean? I don’t want to assume you mean that as an insult.

Keemun

…no.Why would I want to insult you,young Lady?
You are very particular about taste of teas…which I find hard to enjoy with a yellow tea.That’s why I was taken by surprise reading you exciting comment.But of course: different people, different teas,different tastes…maybe I simply haven’t met THE yellow tea that carries the ability to blow my socks off…

Cofftea

Ok, demanding just has a negative connotation here.:) Actually I’m much more demanding (or I like to say “type A”) in how I prepare tea vs what I like. Now that I’m getting into pu erhs I pretty much like anything that isn’t red rooibos or has fennel, licorice, or anise. I also do not prefer blacks. I have yet to try green rooibos, yerba mate, and honey bush, and I hope to one day enjoy rooibos.

Keemun

…you don’t like blacks but you are getting in to Pe-Erhs…have to digest that first. Well, we certainly could argue now about the taste difference between blacks and Chinese red teas…no mood for…feel a bit week today.Guess a fever is on it’s approach (…plus except for a redicolous Peppermint ‘Tea’-bag this morning I didn’t have anything propper to drink…grrr…)…but,yeah sorry, I start to drift away…The questions I actualy was about to ask:are you drinking green pu-erhs?

Cofftea

Keemun, yeah I can’t figure it out. As much as I don’t care for non chai blacks, I’m quite surprised I like cooked pu erhs as much as I do, but that’s probably because as dark as they are, they aren’t blacks. Although I do prefer raw pu erh (to answer your question) based on the one I’ve tried… but that’s because raw pu erhs are like green oolongs, whites, and greens, not blacks and dark oolongs.

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