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2010 Bai Hao

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Payton
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 min, 45 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Amazing. Honey and cream. Sweet and comforting. This is real Bai Hao. Each and every leaf I find in the pot is a perfect two-leaves-and-a-bud with a glowing golden hue. Seems to last about 4-5...” Read full tasting note
    97
    sirbrillig 108 tasting notes
  • “My first cup of Bai Hao served to me 3 years ago was fantastic. Over the years I have slowly forgotten why I and everyone else in the world enjoyed this tea as much as we did. It got to the point...” Read full tasting note
    96
    matthewmagnuson 7 tasting notes

From Hua Tai Tea

夏の時期に発生するウンカが茶葉をかむことで独特な風味が出る。

http://www.chinatea.co.jp/~homepage/index.php?view=2&view3=1&products_id=00000003025&from=1

About Hua Tai Tea View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

97
108 tasting notes

Amazing. Honey and cream. Sweet and comforting. This is real Bai Hao. Each and every leaf I find in the pot is a perfect two-leaves-and-a-bud with a glowing golden hue. Seems to last about 4-5 infusions.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 1 min, 45 sec

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96
7 tasting notes

My first cup of Bai Hao served to me 3 years ago was fantastic. Over the years I have slowly forgotten why I and everyone else in the world enjoyed this tea as much as we did. It got to the point that I rarely made myself a cup of Bai Hao. All of this changed for me when I was traveling in Taiwan with a friend.

This Bai Hao tea ended up being one of the best uncovered gems of the trip. We literally just stumbled up the shop selling it and made the purchase based on the way the dry leaves looked and smelled.

Dry Leaves: Wu se cha; 5 color tea, is a name that definitely best describes the dry look. The leaves look pristine, the way they curl around each other and clump together. There are different hughes of dark red, bordering on brown with some grey tips thrown in.

Infusion: The infusion liqueur is a deep red. The smell is so sweet- both a tropical sweetness and a malty sweetness.

Taste: The taste is very similar to a nice smooth, bold, and rich chinese black tea. But there are more layers than just that. Buried beneath the malty flavor lies a tropical pineapple paired with black pepper qualities.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 1 min, 30 sec

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