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Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by aldantefax
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 30 sec

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  • “Drinking this in the "Wu Yi" style with a bunch of tea leaves stacked up (3 tbsp dry!) in a gaiwan makes a smooth, somewhat herbal, very slightly fruity, and malty cup that gives way to an overall...” Read full tasting note
    75
    aldantefax 8 tasting notes

From Imperial Tea Court

Traditionally, tea merchants keep all of their oolongs for aging, firing the tea yearly to remove unwanted moisture and further heighten and seal in flavors. After years of gentle firing, the tea develops a smooth, rich texture that’s unequaled by newer oolong tea. The dark ruby color and its thick, chewy mouth feel are sorely missing in “new age” oolong teas. The Chinese also use aged oolongs to help regulate digestive ailments. If you’ve forgotten, or you have not tasted a highly oxidized and high-fired oolong tea, this aged old oolong is your chance to discover the past again.

About Imperial Tea Court View company

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1 Tasting Note

75
8 tasting notes

Drinking this in the “Wu Yi” style with a bunch of tea leaves stacked up (3 tbsp dry!) in a gaiwan makes a smooth, somewhat herbal, very slightly fruity, and malty cup that gives way to an overall sweetness. Unlike some Taiwanese oolongs, this is more of a relaxing tea.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 30 sec

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