Taiwan Red Jade

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by SFTGFOP
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 45 sec

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “~Queued post, written September 10th 2014~ I have become increasingly interested in Taiwanese black teas lately, so when I was finally allowed to place an order a sample of this went into the...” Read full tasting note
    94
    Angrboda 1290 tasting notes
  • “Considering the price, this tea is a serious let down. Caramel, candied fruit flavours, and eucalyptus (and if you go on the website it mentions mint). This is exactly the same tones and notes...” Read full tasting note
    46
    sftgfop 149 tasting notes

From Jing Tea

Whole leaf Taiwan black tea grown in Nantou, Taiwan.

Delicious caramel and candied fruit flavours with highly aromatic notes of eucalyptus.

About Jing Tea View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

94
1290 tasting notes

Queued post, written September 10th 2014

I have become increasingly interested in Taiwanese black teas lately, so when I was finally allowed to place an order a sample of this went into the basket without a second thought. Muscovado sugar, baked fruits and eucalyptus, the description says. Eucalyptus?!? Give it here! In Denmark you can get these little eucalyptus flavoured winegums. Not a super-popular type of sweetie, but I think they’re lovely, and a bag will last a long time too.

The company description seems very accurate on the aroma. Baked fruit and some kind of dark sugar? Yes, absolutely. It reminds me of some kind of crumble. The eucalyptus is less obvious, but I am getting a note which makes me think, “yes, that must be it. Why have I never thought of that before?” It’s a familiar note. I’ve just never made the eucalyptus connection with it, and that’s odd because that association just clicks.

It’s the same with the flavour. The caramel-y sugar note is very strong and it’s followed by a note of baked apples. I’m almost expecting a spoonful of custard to go with this here apple crumble that isn’t actually there.

But how does eucalyptus fit in? It’s not really something I imagine that goes well with fruity desserts and that sort of thing, but… it fits. It adds oomph and adds a bit of finish. It lifts the cup from being a mild little dessert tea to something rather more powerful which is very suitable for first cup of the day. It’s a strong and flavourful tea and I’m very happy with this.

I feel even more motivated to embark on a torrid love affair with Taiwanese blacks now.

(Oh, and for the record, in spite of what this post might imply, it probably wouldn’t be a good idea to attempt to enhance an actual apple crumble with eucalyptus or similar…)

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46
149 tasting notes

Considering the price, this tea is a serious let down.

Caramel, candied fruit flavours, and eucalyptus (and if you go on the website it mentions mint). This is exactly the same tones and notes one detects in a Ceylon. Jing just felt like raising the price because its unusual to find a black tea from Taiwan.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 45 sec

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