Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Caramel, Chocolate, Dark Bittersweet, Floral, Fruity, Raisins, Smoke, Cocoa, Malt
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Joseph Wesley Black Tea
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 3 min, 30 sec 13 oz / 394 ml

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17 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Backlog: This is the third tea that I've tried from this company, and I love it too. I have been very impressed with everything that I've tried from them. The leaves are gorgeous (I love that...” Read full tasting note
    96
    LiberTEAS 4366 tasting notes
  • “This was a pleasant cup. I quite enjoyed it. A little smokey, a touch of hay, and a nice coppery background with a bare hint of malt and astringency. Perfect for sipping on while I study for my...” Read full tasting note
    79
    indigobloom 1300 tasting notes
  • “The Classic Chinese doesn’t just smell “classic” when dry. Book fiends will get lost with their noses in it, with the leaves’ aroma of ancient dark halls filled with heavy scrolls; a library from...” Read full tasting note
    83
    SnootyTeaPerson 90 tasting notes
  • “Sad sad day. I was expecting my delivery of samples from Joseph Wesley earlier this week. Despite tracking saying it delivered, it had not! So, this weekend the package finally arrives. With a note...” Read full tasting note
    90
    Kokabel 38 tasting notes

From Joseph Wesley Black Tea

Joseph Wesley’s Black Tea No. 3 is an organically-certified hand-harvested tea from the famed Long Jing cultivars of China’s Zhejiang Province. The tea was harvested from the mountains of Zhu Jia Jian island in the Putuo district of the Zhoushan archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. Bold and straightforward this delightful tea can be enjoyed throughout the day and will pair with any of your favorite adjuncts (milk and sugar / spice and honey). Because we had this tea crafted from the same tea leaves and gardens as Joseph Wesley’s Dragonwell Seasonal Release, you can sample a flight of both to experience how the oxidation process unique to black teas fundamentally changes the color, taste and aroma of a single tea leaf.

About Joseph Wesley Black Tea View company

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17 Tasting Notes

96
346 tasting notes

Let’s get the “dirty” outta the way.

I’m kinda drunk as I write this..today?

I needed a tea capper for an evening well spent.

Joseph Wesley was where I paid my black rent.

TeaCuplets: http://lazyliteratus.tumblr.com/post/80849224791/teacuplets-joseph-wesley-tea-no-3-chinese-classic

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 15 sec 1 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

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88
338 tasting notes

This is a tasting note of a new #3.
i got a free sample of it along with the tin of original Classic Chinese. thank you so much for letting me try. Since i didnt have parameters, i think my way doesnt do a justice to this tea.
1/2 TBSP 185F 6 oz 3min
Dry leaves are long, thin and twisted. I love the smell of dry leaves. The brew is golden brown, its sweet dark chocolate, bread, toffee, nuts. very pleasant and refined. Somehow it reminds me Laoshan Black, but i didnt try LB long time, so maybe I’m wrong.
So, if original Classic Chinese is a bad boy, this version is Park Ave princess.
Now Joe you have to help me with the right parameters;)

Terri HarpLady

The parameters: something I was just thinking about with teas :)
I like to be able to try a tea several different ways

yyz

I tend to do my own thing, unless the tea turns out epically awful the first time, then I either try the parameters or look for other advice.

boychik

i just have a feeling my temp was too low. And its a sample. i can play with it only one more time :(

yyz

Maybe a little:). I had to look it up. I still don’t get fareinheit, you would think it would stick in my head a little bit better the length of time I’ve been on this site!

Angrboda

I use boiling for black tea. Always.
What’s the difference between this and the old one? I have the old one.

boychik

they are absolutely different. i think i like the old one more…

Joseph Wesley Black Tea

boychik, the suits of Park Avenue are just not for you I guess. It’s interesting because the two teas taste very different, however, they’re made from the same leaves. The only difference is that the new #3 is just the bud and two leaves and the leaves are much more intact and not broken. The new one has a much smoother fruiter taste whereas the old #3 (new T1 tea bags) is much spicier and more earthy. I think boychik’s metaphors were spot on.

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84
1270 tasting notes

I’m skipping the queue with this one, because I need to gush! There will be a queued post later, so that I’m not neglecting those.

I’m having Bad Dog! tea. I hadn’t heard about this company before, until SimplyJenW made a post about their Keemun in which it was mentioned that it had been grown in Fujian. This caught my interest. Keemun and Fujian black. And not just any bit of Fujian. No, it was near the village of Tan Yang! A combination of my two favouritest things in the world of tea? Was it a blend? No, it wasn’t. My guess was that it must be like that Taiwanese Assam that Butiki has, the one which is made from Assam cultivars but grown in Taiwan. This was indeed what was going on.

Steepsterites. I needed this tea in my life. I needed it like air!

I made some inquiries regarding the possibility of shipping to Denmark and what it would cost, and Joseph Wesley is a very kind soul who really went out of his way to help me get an order. Long story short, order was placed through email, and payment sent through paypal. And this is where my jaw dropped and I had to do a little dance of victory. What I had ordered would have made me eligible for free shipping, had I been in the US. Obviously, this was not feasible for him to do when shipping to Denmark, so instead he offered to pay half the shipping cost for me, so that I still got something out of having ordered for that much. So many companies would have simply said ‘sorry, we can’t give you free shipping to Europe, because we don’t normally ship there,’ and I’d have been fine with that. This solution that Joseph Wesley offered me would never even have occurred to me! I thought it was very generous of him to offer it, and if he hadn’t, I’m not sure I would have placed the order at all. It made the difference between what I’m willing to pay for shipping and what I’m not. Clearly this guy had taken pity on me in my Fujian Keemun desperation and decided to move sun and moon to make it happen. I went HOORAY! and forked over the money.

The generosity didn’t stop there, though. Let me tell you, Steepsterites, what happened next.

Joseph Wesley has seven different teas on his website, six of which I was interested in trying. There was the aforementioned gold nugget, this one which I’ll be writing about in a moment, an Assam (I’m becoming interested in Assam lately), three more Chinese blacks and a Darjeeling. Pass on the Darj. I don’t much care for that stuff. But the others! When ordering samples, you can get three samples, five samples or seven samples. Ideally, at this point I would have liked four, but I then realised that I’ll be sending a parcel to Auggy shortly, so why not ask for doubles and share with her? Seeing as how we appreciate the same sort of qualities in our black teas and generally love the same things, I should like to have her opinion as well. And I was already planning on sharing some of the Fujian Keemun with her anyway. So in the end I opted for seven samples, three of which were doubles.

When I then received my parcel, it included a handwritten letter from Joseph Wesley about how my size order fell just exactly in a zone of ‘no practical packaging’ and that he had included an extra free sample! I now have doubles of all the samples to share with Auggy! YAY!

How fabulous is that?

I didn’t start with the coveted Fujian Keemun, though. I haven’t tried it yet. I’m waiting for the Right Moment. Well, actually I just want to go around a look at the tin for a bit and just look forward to it. And pet it now and then. :)

This one I also got a tin of, and it’s from Zheijiang province. I am certain that I’ve had tea from there before, but I’d have to dig deep in my notes to find out which ones it was, so for all intents and purposes, it’s new to me.

I followed the suggestion from Joseph Wesley of using significantly cooler water than I normally would have. He suggests the same temperatures that I would normally have used for a white tea, or perhaps a particularly hardy green. This rather went against everything I’ve learned about my own preferences, but I thought, since I’d seen it I’d give it a go. I don’t normally look for these things at all, you see. I’ve been at this long enough to know what I like and how I like it, and next time I have this, it’ll very likely be the way I would normally brew, so I can see if there is a discernable difference. I expect the cultivar is dictating the temperature somewhat here.

The aroma is very mild and malty. I’m having a hard time really getting it. It does that thing where I can almost imagine that it’s somehow heavier than air, and I can sense it hovering there above the tea, but I can’t draw it into my nose properly. It’s quite strange.

It tastes… You know my very first thought was licorice. Not the anise-y unlicorice that some of you call licorice (Ha! I must laugh! Ha!) and which has nothing to do with proper licorice. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Anise =/= licorice. Anise doesn’t even taste like licorice. It tastes like anise.Not proper, real licorice which is as black as night, it has a chewy texture and preferably salty. Paradoxically, Real Proper Licorice which is chewy and preferably salty, doesn’t actually have too much to do with licorice root either. I’m sure it’s made of the stuff somehow. Some kind of extract probably, but it tastes different from actual dried licorice root. And when I say ‘this reminded me at first of licorice’ I meant Real Proper. Not anise, not licorice root.

Gosh that was long and complicated for something that was just a fleeting thought. I’ve accidentally made this cup a bit strong. I thought I had more water in the kettle when I measured out the leaf, you see, but the tea, although a wee bit astringent, has not been damaged. No bitterness. If I had used boiling water like I normally would I might not have been so lucky with it.

Now, what I’m actually picking up here when the licorice moment has passed is an underlying note of dark chocolate. Very dark chocolate. Well within the range of 70%+ cocoa here, and yet it’s still chocolate rather than cocoa. It’s rather hiding a bit. I just find myself sitting there going hmm, grain, yes, slightly floral, yes, bit Keemun-y, yes, hey, what was that? And there it is, lurking underneath all the rest is the chocolate. I’m also getting a smidge of cherries in it, but not until it’s all cooled down to lukewarm at the bottom of the cup, and even then it’s just a teensy bit, but still. Cherry.

Basically this reminds me of a strong Keemun with some chocolate-y notes in it and a wee bit of cherry. I’m really rather enjoying this, even though I accidentally overleafed it a bit.

K S

I do understand the licorice anise difference thing, though I am one of those who has used the comparison in a review. I had an uncle that kept real licorice candy around to chew on. It is so completely different from the black jelly bean licorice of today.

Ysaurella

you review really makes me want to have a look at this website for the teas and for the client service.

MzPriss

I’ma keemun lover myself and SimplyJenW recommended JW’s keemun – the coupled with this awesome review just led me to order samples from JW.

MzPriss

Clearly I am not awake enough to be typing – excuse my typos. I just ordered samples of this one, the keemun and the bai ling. Can’t wait to get them!

Nicole

As soon as I cave and start buying tea again for myself they are definitely on my list to place an order with.

SimplyJenW

So glad you got a chance to try the tea! Just wait until you try the others! And yes, the service is fantastic.

Joseph Wesley Black Tea

thanks everyone for the kind words. I’m happy that you are enjoying the teas. The makers of this particular tea are wonderful and I’m happy they agreed to use their long jing cultivars to make this tea. As an aside, we’re in the process of taking this tea out of our series of loose leaf tea and putting it into tea bags (sachets) so that we can make room for one or two new black teas. We’re hopeful that the new bags/pyramids/sachets will be available in the next month or two. Thanks again, Joe

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92
974 tasting notes

Tea of the morning……

This is a great morning tea. It is heavier on the malt than what I usually drink. In fact, it kind of reminds me of Assam in a way. Nice and hearty, dark chocolate notes, with a serious kick. Today I decided to brew by the mug, and the second steep at 6 minutes was just as good and hearty as the first.

I think I read in a response to another Steepster poster that this one was going into sachet only form soon. I do find that kind of disappointing, just because I am a loose leaf drinker and only use bagged tea when I travel. It is not so much that I don’t think a high quality tea should come in sachet form, as I like the simplicity and reduced waste from loose leaf as much as I love the flavor. I also understand that business has to evolve in order to survive. Bagged tea makes more sense for some and is very convenient. I am one customer, and I want the company to be around for a while, so I am going to trust what is going on for now.

Usual mug method.

Flavors: Dark Bittersweet, Malt

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 4 min, 0 sec 2 tsp 14 OZ / 414 ML
MzPriss

Agree. Makes me sad too :(

Joseph Wesley Black Tea

It gives me hope that you want the tea to stay in loose leaf form. With that said, one of our goals is to limit the number of teas we make available so that you may have a more meaningful relationship with them. It’s always seemed that offering 60+ teas might make good business sense but doesn’t help the customer gain an appreciation for any particular tea. We’re taking this tea out of the line-up so that we can introduce another loose leaf tea that I believe is better suited for our project. I hope that after you taste the new tea you’ll approve of our decision to give the #3 jersey to this new tea. As always, thanks for the comments. -Joe

SimplyJenW

Joseph Wesley Black Tea, I am definitely looking forward to whatever you have to offer in the future. I do appreciate your approach, which is why I am excited to see how it unfolds. Yes, the (hopefully) more dignified version of fan-girling, here!

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