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Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by chadao
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  • “The dry leaves sitting in my gaiwan are all white buds, covered with white, downy hairs. I am disappointed to notice that the tea is not quite as strikingly white as other Bai Hao Yin Zhen that I...” Read full tasting note
    75
    chadao 45 tasting notes

From Ku Cha House of Tea

Silver Needle (also known as Bai Hao Yin Zhen) is made of the only tea buds picked in early spring. After being meticulously hand picked from the stem, the buds are fanned and dried in the sun before being lightly fired over charcoal at a very low heat, which serves to finish drying the tea while preserving its beautiful silver color. The sweetest of white teas, Silver Needle will coat your mouth with a clean, smooth sweetness. This is a great tea for a hot summer day, even served hot, as it lowers body heat. Since production is limited, this is a rare treat that is not to be missed!

Origin:
FuDing County, FuJian Province, China

Dry Leaves:
Delicate, hairy silver buds

Infusion:
Pale gold

About Ku Cha House of Tea View company

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1 Tasting Note

75
45 tasting notes

The dry leaves sitting in my gaiwan are all white buds, covered with white, downy hairs. I am disappointed to notice that the tea is not quite as strikingly white as other Bai Hao Yin Zhen that I have seen.

The first brew yields a sweet, complex aroma that reminds me of freshly boiled pumpkin. The mouth feel is heavy bodied, and the flavor is like butternut squash and fresh walnuts. The second steeping reveals an apple-like sweetness, and the body becomes lighter. Unfortunately, there is a hint of bitterness to this brew.

The wet leaves reveal mostly whole buds, with a fair number (about 25%) of broken leaves.

The third steeping retains its sweetness and loses its astringency. The fourth steeping has a nice umami flavor. Sadly, I’m all tea’d out after this, so I am unable to do more.

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