Mei Shan Farmers' Association Oolong Tea Competition Two-Plum-Flower (Grade V) Winner

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by cultureflip
Average preparation
Not available

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

0 Want it Want it

0 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

  • “High Mountain awesome. Delicate, creamy and floral with a looooong hui gan of peaches and cream. All of the typical "greener style" oolong flavors are there but with an element of refinement as...” Read full tasting note
    88
    robc22 144 tasting notes

From Life In Teacup

Spring 2010, Jiayi County, Taiwan
Mei Shan Village Farmers’ Association (梅山鄉農會) Competition (Mei Shan is a high mountain region of Ali Shan Moutain range). It’s one of the highly reputable competition of light roast high mountain oolong. Candidate teas are from tea plantations of 1200m (3600 ft.) elevation. There are five evaluation events every year in this competition. We focus on Spring and Winter competitions, products from which are the most popular. The award levels are (from the highest): Superior Grade (特等獎), Grade I (頭等獎), Grade II (二等獎), Grade III (三等獎), three-plum-flower (三朵梅) – we label this as Grade IV, two-plum-flower (二朵梅) – we label this as Grade V.

About Life In Teacup View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

88
144 tasting notes

High Mountain awesome. Delicate, creamy and floral with a looooong hui gan of peaches and cream. All of the typical “greener style” oolong flavors are there but with an element of refinement as the wet leaf aroma comes through sweet and precise. The liquor is refreshingly bright and smooth that is balanced by a perfectly weighty mouthfeel and the tartness at the end unfurls slowly into the aforementioned sweet hui gan. High marks for this one.

ananna

I don’t know what a sweet hui gan is but I agree with everything else you said. I like way the flavor rolls around and the bursts of flavor end in that tartness as well.

cultureflip

hui gan (or huay gan) is the flavor of the air that returns from your throat after you have swallowed the tea. kind of like an aftertaste but it does not necessarily originate in the mouth. good teas have impressive hui gan. ive found that sometimes the flavor of the hui gan is reminiscent of the wet aroma of the tea. comes full circle, in a way.

cultureflip

hui gan (or huay gan) is the flavor of the air that returns from your throat after you have swallowed the tea. kind of like an aftertaste but it does not necessarily originate in the mouth. good teas have impressive hui gan. ive found that sometimes the flavor of the hui gan is reminiscent of the wet aroma of the tea. comes full circle, in a way.

Login or sign up to leave a comment.