Menghai Dayi "Star of Menghai" 2010

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by mrmopar
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 45 sec

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From Menghai Tea Factory

This tea was first released in 2005 as a high-leavel ripe tea product. The leaves from the high mountains of Menghai Country, they are moderately fermented to produce one of our boldest flavored teas. It yields a bright amber broth with a rich, pure arom and lingering undertones. This tea is the embodiment of Menghai Tea Factory’s skills at the fermentation process, and has a high collector’s value.

2005 China International Tea Industry Exposition Gold Medal Award product. Made with selected high mountain material from Menghai area.

sold on ebay by berylleb and Dragon Tea House, possibly others

About Menghai Tea Factory View company

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3 Tasting Notes

92
673 tasting notes

Thank you mrmopar for this Sample Pu-erh!

Now that the stress of selling my car is over…sigh…I am reasonably clear headed and able to drink Pu-erh’s and
enjoy them without working so hard to find the inner calm that’s
needed to write. It’s been a good lesson.
I’m retired, the rest of you Steepster’s go to work or have kids or school and busy lives. You make time to fit in your own tea reviews and stories. I appreciate your effort more than you know.

Review:

Steep time and 1 wash were 30 seconds for each.

The wet leaf began as a raisin muffin scent and ground walnuts, then a leathery rye bread and finally a bakery scent.

Color for each steeping was red/brown, dark red/brown and very dark golden red/brown liquor with each one absolutely clear.

1. I noticed the energy in the tea before the taste. A powerful feeling from a smooth sweet tea that tasted more like the familiar scent of walking through the redwood forest than the earth underneath. It was that tree bark that I’m familiar with and grew up around. (I have no experience with cedar except small pieces of wood) I noticed a peppery feel in my mouth that was playful, like dappled light bouncing up and around. The finish was silky.

2. Oooh this was a much darker woodsy cedar bark flavor. I could still see the bottom of the Gaiwan through the dark brew, but the taste stopped just shy of becoming a bitter bark. As the tea cooled the mouth-feel was thicker but still bright and a little dry right at the back of the throat.

3. Out of the forest proper and arriving at my daughters cabin/house in a clearing at the corner of Conference and Pine (where the huge redwood tree came crashing down and smashed the car, the camper and all the bikes one Winter), Annalisa would be making bread as always…with bits of seeds or nuts and bread crumbs stuck to the baking stones…still toasting away but not burnt. (I’d be looking for the covered butter dish and Olallieberry Jam!).

The Pu-erh was smelling more like the baking bits on the stone and not like the forest or trees anymore. Third steeping’s often become the best of the best. There was a little flatness to the tea that I thought could use a perking up.
I added 1/4 tsp of raw sugar and the savory quality of the Pu-erh came out in buckets! Wow! I was so pleased! The tea tasted sooo good!

Such a good Pu-erh!
(Listen, purists may scoff…(Bonnie adds sugar to Pu-erh…what a dumb lady!)… but noone scoffs at seasoning food. Salt and sugar are used to draw out hidden flavor so I experiment.)

Meandering thoughts:
My little story is not much today. Just a memory of walking in the forest. My family history with a place in the Coast Redwoods goes back to the 1920’s where there was a little community with Summer cabins and a Conference Center, a big cement pool and row boats on a creek. My Aunt Jessie (born in the 1880’s) had an old cabin there where family gathered.
My parents had their honeymoon there, my daughter was married in the Chapel there, her first home was there. I went to camp and we all have our sweet memories.
The best is walking alone through the floor of the forest with towering trees overhead and dappled sunlight barely able to reach the soft spongy red/brown ground below. If you want to know why I love Pu-erh, it might be because of the aroma of the redwood forest. It looks like a forest of chunky and furry Pu-erh! To hide in a tree hollow, or stand in a natural ring of redwoods and look up at the sky is mystical. The trees lift their hands wiggling their green fingers… far beyond what I am able to do in thanksgiving for such beauty.
One of my regular paths led down to Bean Creek and had a small creeklet of water next to it…lined with ferns (looking quite prehistoric) which ended at an old swinging bridge where I could walk across, then down to a sandy beach and see the former creeklet cascading as a grand waterfall into the the larger Bean Creek in front of me.http://youtu.be/nBLkhNoX9Dc (wow found this later on youtube…the waterfall and creek)
My parents and grandparents, my children and grandchildren all have the memory of this place.

Tea is grand for memories. (now that I read that phrase it sounds
too dumb…Tea is not ‘grand for memories’ it kicks my butt! I have memory problems! I’m a visual thinker who’s thinker is broken and tea helps kick it into the remembering mode…so that’s what I mean!)

Dylan Oxford

Haha, well then I suppose we’re lucky we get the post-kick-thinker!

TheTeaFairy

Bonnie, I understood exactly what you meant, your thoughts are a lot clearer than you think :-) even when you’re not feeling too good, I can always relate to what you write because there’s an energy that won’t lie in your writting, just like tea itself!

Bonnie

Thank you. It’s difficult not knowing if you make sense.

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84
58 tasting notes

Thank you, Bonnie, for the sample :)

Dry smell: This tea smells really nice. It smells very very sweet. It has an unusually vegetal smell for a puerh. It is a moist smell like a fresh forest. I can also smell a little hint of green bean.

Wet smell: This tea smells really great after the first steeping. It still has the extremely sweet smell and vegetal taste. The most prominent smell is still something that reminds me of green snap pea’s

Taste: The taste is kinda funky. It has a sweet taste but also a starchy note and feel. There is a deep woody flavor that tastes like a freshly cut down tree.

EDIT: After 1.5 litres of my red aura cake and a litre of this I’m feeling really calm, happy, and relaxed. I’m assuming this is what people describe as qi. I’m not sure if it’s just this tea or a combination of both

Preparation
Boiling
mrmopar

oh the red aura is a great tea. i got 3 different production years of it. i can’t wait to see how it ages.i agree about the star of menghai it will be better in a couple of more years i think.

Bonnie

The cut down tree is probably cedar and the starchy is like a thick feeling like avacado but not that thick pasty. Hard to explain isn’t it. You did well…got to your happy feeling.

Insence&Tea

Yup that sounds exactly what I experienced. It’s so difficult interpreting and passing on all the complexities that a tea has. Hopefully I’m getting better so my reviews can be of use to others

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77
199 tasting notes

very smooth with a hint of natural sweetness. earthy and dark good for multiple steeps.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 45 sec

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