Organic White Peony

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Jason
Average preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 4 min, 30 sec

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This is my first white tea. I really enjoy the dry leaf - fluffy, green and white, smelling very much of dried fruit to me. After steeping, I'm surprised to find that this tea is not nearly as...” Read full tasting note
    52
    crankybarista 5 tasting notes
  • “I'm not really sure what to think of this. I waited to have a few cups to form some sort of opinion and I'm still pretty ambivalent. It's a pleasant enough tea and tastes very green. You know how...” Read full tasting note
    57
    bleepnik 117 tasting notes

From Mighty Leaf Tea

White Peony white tea, also known as Bai Mu Dan, is an elegant White Tea and Zhenghe varietal of the highest quality. Produced in China’s Fujian province during early spring, by carefully selecting only the finest tender buds and top two leaves of the white tea plant. This results in a unique nutty or bamboo fragrance and a sweet, savory taste.

About Mighty Leaf Tea View company

Mighty Leaf Tea was born for the sole purpose of infusing life into an ancient indulgence by creating tea products that reach new heights of quality and innovation. Our passion is creating the most incredible handcrafted tea blends found anywhere, globally sourcing the finest ingredients available. Paralleling the highest standards of quality at Mighty Leaf Tea is ongoing creative innovation.

2 Tasting Notes

52
5 tasting notes

This is my first white tea. I really enjoy the dry leaf – fluffy, green and white, smelling very much of dried fruit to me. After steeping, I’m surprised to find that this tea is not nearly as subtle or delicate as I was expecting of a white tea – maybe I steeped too long or used too much of the leaf? The liquor is relatively dark and the aroma strong and woody.

The first taste I get is wood… dry wood. Bamboo at best, but more realistically driftwood. At the same time, I taste Brazil nut – somewhere in there. Then it gets floral, and underneath that, rather grassy. The aftertaste, however, is sweet. Kind of nutty too. Dried apricot, I’d call it.

This tea hits some nice notes, but overall, I don’t particularly like it. The dryness and woodiness do not appeal to me all that much. My favorite part is the fruity bit at the end, but that is perhaps the most subtle note. Also, this tea got bitter on the second steep, which came as a disappointment.

Admittedly, I wasn’t terribly careful in brewing this tea, so my opinion may change with further experimentation. Since I have so much of it, I think I might play around a little more and see if different temperatures and steep times yield more agreeable results.

Preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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57
117 tasting notes

I’m not really sure what to think of this. I waited to have a few cups to form some sort of opinion and I’m still pretty ambivalent. It’s a pleasant enough tea and tastes very green. You know how “green” things have a certain flavour, like young, sweet peas? This is kind of like that. In fact, it does remind me a bit of young, sweet peas, which is probably what I find a bit odd about it.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 6 min, 0 sec

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