Monk's Tieguanyin Baozhong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Oolong Tea Leaves
Flavors
Floral, Vegetal
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Organic
Edit tea info Last updated by LuckyMe
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 g 7 oz / 214 ml

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  • “Hmm, so this Baozhong is made from a Tie Guan Yin cultivar but it doesn’t really exhibit the characteristics of either. The lightly twisted long leaves have a slightly pungent vegetal smell and...” Read full tasting note
    72

From Mountain Stream Teas

This is a traditionally produced Baozhong using the Tieguanyin** cultivar grow by Monks and Nuns in the mountains of Pinglin just outside of Taipei. And it is wonderfully strange. The golden sweet/sour fruit notes of the Tieguanyin cultivar is on show in the upfront taste, before it moves to a thick buttery mouthfeel in the mid mouth before ending in a sweet, almost-floral-but-not-quite vegetal lingering aftertaste. It is a fascinating clash of worlds, and an another example of why we love Taiwanese teas so much!

**Tieguanyin is both a cultivar and a style of producing tea which can make it a little complicated. In this case, it is just the name of the cultivar, not the production style, of this tea.

Elevation: 300-400m

Status: Certified Organic

Cultivar: Tieguanyin

Season: April 8th, 2020

Method: Hand picked, processed on site, small batch

Oxidization: 5-8%

Region: Pinglin, New Taipei City

Recommend Brewing Style:

Gong Fu Style: 3-5g per 100ml, ~95C(205f) water, 30-40-50 second steeps then 10-15 seconds + to taste. Lasts 4+ steeps.

Western Style: 3-5 per 100ml. 2-3 minutes steeps.

Grandpa Style: 3-5g per mug. Keep adding water as you drink to taste.

About Mountain Stream Teas View company

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1 Tasting Note

72
535 tasting notes

Hmm, so this Baozhong is made from a Tie Guan Yin cultivar but it doesn’t really exhibit the characteristics of either. The lightly twisted long leaves have a slightly pungent vegetal smell and quite a few stems. Flavor wise, it isn’t terribly exciting. It tastes like a generic Chinese oolong. Grassy, with a nondescript floral element, and the barest hint of fruit. It lacks the thick buttery florals of TGY and the lilac bouquet that is classic Baozhong.

Flavors: Floral, Vegetal

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 1 g 7 OZ / 214 ML

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