Wild Orchid Pearl Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Kashyap
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 0 sec 2 g 4 oz / 120 ml

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Wild Orchid Pearl Oolong ~ Nepali Tea Traders Dry: Toasted, malty, tomato, floral-spicy Wet: mussels-sweet ocean brine, peachy-stone fruit Leaf: Carefully twisted golden and umber leaves,...” Read full tasting note
    97
    Kashyap 54 tasting notes
  • “Occasionally, one comes across a tea that perplexes. These leaves definitely have me pondering. Nepali Tea Traders classify the tea as oolong (semi-oxidized / semi-ball style) and by all...” Read full tasting note
    85
    Revoluzzion 22 tasting notes

From Nepali Tea Traders

This distinctive tea is plucked just before Nepal’s tea plants go dormant in mid-November. The beautiful pearls produce a subtle flavor with an amber infusion. This exquisite, complex oolong produces aromas of wild orchids. The flavor is soothingly fruity, characteristic of the finest of the autumnal teas from the Jasbirey foothills of Sandakphu.

One heaping teaspoon of tea per 8-ounce cup. Cool boiling water to 190 degrees (approximately 30 seconds) and steep tea approximately 3 minutes.

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2 Tasting Notes

97
54 tasting notes

Wild Orchid Pearl Oolong ~ Nepali Tea Traders
Dry: Toasted, malty, tomato, floral-spicy
Wet: mussels-sweet ocean brine, peachy-stone fruit
Leaf: Carefully twisted golden and umber leaves, crafted in spirals and knots, dark against light, with reddish-sienna leaf hints. Pale golden pollen clings to the leaves and the bag. Almost a ‘temple of heaven’ –like look but with a darker and more complex appearance, laced with fuzzy gold and straw-hued threads.
Cup: Rose-brassy-orange hued liquor. Bright and sweet, light bodied, with dancing mineral notes, hints of roasted squash, walnut, and marigold. As the tea cools, hints of vegetal and spicy-floral notes deepen and emerge. Summery and crisp this tea is flavorful and dynamic.
2nd extraction added hints of lime zest and deepened the body as the leaves unfurled further. Sparkling and bright with a developing herbaceous and toasted bread aspect and continued floral and spicy canvas.
3rd extraction is extremely smooth and rich with a clean, sweet muscatel and slightly dry, spicy wine-like finish. The body develops and orchid fleshy weight that is supported by the vegetal and floral balance.
Directions: used 5g in 8oz of 200 degree water, in glass pot and decanted into glass cha hai to aerate, and then poured into ceramic cup. All tea ware was heated prior to use. First extraction was 2 minutes, second was 4 minutes, and third was 3 minutes; 4th extraction was thin in color and character and was not included.
Notes: The brightness and hue of the liquor is captivating and has a deeply reflective and powerfully light catching radiance that is worth being mindful of steeping, just to capture it. The ‘orchid’ in the name is interesting, as I was able to understand it a bit more as I explored the extraction and steeps, finding that it did indeed carry a orchid ‘fleshy’ leaf mouth feel/flavor that was woven into is at various temperatures and extractions.
My experiences with the ocean and at the edges of the sea are occasionally triggered by some teas and this was one of those rare moments. The cleaned, ocean-brine scent of a cleaned mussel shell finds itself in the still steaming leaves of the just poured 1st extraction. It was not a aroma I would have expected nor the hint of earth or barn that also weave into it as the leaves cool.
The crisp and brightness of the tea is extremely refreshing when ‘drink-ably hot’ and becomes clean and smooth bodied as it cools. The spicy floral finish is akin to a Darjeeling 2nd flush but more subtle and tickling.
I would easily rate this as one of the best offerings I have had from Nepali Tea Traders and while very different from the Ama Dablam White tea, I would say its an easy second for its color, range, crisp flavor and the discovery of orchid notes in the cup.

Nepali Tea Traders had this to say: This distinctive tea is plucked just before Nepal’s tea plants go dormant in mid-November. The beautiful pearls produce a subtle flavor with an amber infusion. This exquisite, complex oolong produces aromas of wild orchids. The flavor is soothingly fruity, characteristic of the finest of the autumnal teas from the Jasbirey foothills of Sandakphu.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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85
22 tasting notes

Occasionally, one comes across a tea that perplexes. These leaves definitely have me pondering. Nepali Tea Traders classify the tea as oolong (semi-oxidized / semi-ball style) and by all appearances it ticks the boxes for this category. The taste is floral and fruity as one would expect. However, what sets this tea apart from your standard oolong is that it looks like a white tea following brewing. Perfect bud-sets unfurl to present the classic ‘sword’ shape common to some white teas (particularly silver needle/bai hao yin zhen). It looks like a work of art, which it should. In fact, the lightly brown colour and plump shape looks remarkably like a rare aged white bud. The aroma supports this, with hints of the autumnal notes associated with aged white tea.
Bemused, I undertook a search of my stash and came up with a sample of aged white bud, and cupped the two teas. Aside from the fact the dry leaves of these teas look completely different, the liquor is remarkably close in taste and colour and the wet leaves are almost indistinguishable.
How is it possible that a oolong from Nepal and aged white from Yunnan, China can be so alike? (CUE tea experts, please.)
As to the Wild Orchid, it is very forgiving and can be brewed however you see fit. The leaves will sink to the bottom of your cup, should you choose not to strain them, making it easy to sip your tea Chinese style.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 0 sec 2 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

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