2007 Menghai "Silver Dayi" Sheng Pu-Erh

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Smoke, Sweet, Tobacco, Vegetal
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Pamela Dean
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 oz / 130 ml

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6 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I've already brewed this one a time or two, but didn't take many notes. I was particularly interested in this one because it is from a famous name factory and it is a raw sheng, not a ripe...” Read full tasting note
    80
    teaddict 311 tasting notes
  • “Meaty, metallic sheng with a nice buttery mouthfeel and smokey-sweet, citrus hui gan. There is a slightly wild bite at the end and an underlying asparagus flavor that gives depth. Subsequent...” Read full tasting note
    71
    robc22 144 tasting notes
  • “After the mildness of the 2012 Shuang Yu yesterday I opened another sample packet I had bought today and got quite the hit. The dry leaf promised something wild and robust with its solid hay and...” Read full tasting note
    Roughage 237 tasting notes

From Norbu Tea

Highlights:
-Producer: Menghai Tea Factory
-Vintage: 2004, 2005 blended
-Compression Date: December, 2007
-Growing Region: Menghai County, Xishangbanna

I was very excited to find out that the Menghai Tea Factory, the most famous Pu-Erh tea factory in the south of Yunnan Province, had released a new production of their Silver Dayi Bing Cha. The only other time Menghai has released a Bing Cha similar to this one was in 2003, and it quickly became one of the most collectible teas of the decade. The trademark of the Menghai Tea Factory is the ‘Da Yi’ symbol that appears on their various wrappers, and the wrapper of the 2003 release of this tea was printed in silver-gray. For this reason, ‘Silver Dayi’ became the common name of that production in the marketplace. The wrapper on this tea from 2007 is slightly different, and reads ‘Silver Color Dayi’ to identify the blend of this tea to be a similar recipe to the cake from 2003. According to my Chinese sources, the cake is a blend of 2 and 3 year old sun dried Pu-Erh tea from the Menghai area in Yunnan, and it was compressed in December of 2007. Using slightly aged base material gives this Pu-Erh blend a much more mellow character than other young teas and many distinct layers of flavor that release themselves gradually over many short Gong Fu style steepings. The flavor is also quite pronounced, so it could prove to be an excellent buy for collectors and/or for people to consume in the short run.

About Norbu Tea View company

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6 Tasting Notes

80
311 tasting notes

I’ve already brewed this one a time or two, but didn’t take many notes. I was particularly interested in this one because it is from a famous name factory and it is a raw sheng, not a ripe shu.

I started with little more than I really wanted—that’s the way the beeng broke—4.2 grams into a 75mL gaiwan. Rinsed with boiling water for a good 20 seconds, because the beeng was fairly tightly compressed. Giving it a couple of minutes to hydrate before the first infusion.

A first infusion at 200+ degrees and 20 seconds was a bit unpleasantly strong, as I was forgetting the very concentrated starting material. Should have broken it up into smaller bits, because this really is too much tea for the gaiwan. Regrouping with a 10 second infusion (measuring to the start of the pour from the gaiwan), now the flavors are still strong, but the sweetness is more apparent, along with earthiness and a hint of smoky. The liquor is a pale amber. And because it is infused in boiling water, I have to remember to wait, to not burn my tongue—brewing cooler green, white, and oolong teas there is no such wait required, and it’s hard to discipline myself when the first sips are so nice. 2nd infusion is earthy/sweet/smoky/caramel/vegetal. 3rd, 4th, 5th are very similar, as long as I remember to keep them extra short because of the excess of leaf.

The leaves are fairly broken up, a medium olive green with hints of reddish tints here and there.

I’d recommend a more typical 1 gram per ounce/30mL leaf to water ratio, short infusions with hot water, and a good long time available to enjoy the many infusions from this tea. It is a stronger than my favorite white bud sheng puerh, earthier with more astringency, a deeper rounder flavor overall.

Quite a nice tea, and one that I think I will keep checking in on from time to time, to see how it matures. That’s in part because I currently have more puerh than I can drink in a reasonable period of time, but also because it’s a famous label tea that I expect to be able to find information and comparisons for in years to come.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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71
144 tasting notes

Meaty, metallic sheng with a nice buttery mouthfeel and smokey-sweet, citrus hui gan. There is a slightly wild bite at the end and an underlying asparagus flavor that gives depth. Subsequent steepages bring the bite to the forefront and develop a nice, mild sweetness all the way through. A perfect progression from the Dan Cong appetizer I started with today.

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237 tasting notes

After the mildness of the 2012 Shuang Yu yesterday I opened another sample packet I had bought today and got quite the hit. The dry leaf promised something wild and robust with its solid hay and floral aroma. The brewed tea was a strong amber colour and provided the same hit in a different way. It is sweet and smoky with a mild tobacco edge and vegetal notes. The liquor is creamy and coats the mouth and throat so the smokiness and sweetness endure in the aftertaste. Despite its strength, there is little bitterness or astringency, only enough to enhance the other flavours. This tea is much more in my comfort zone than yesterday’s. I can wrestle with it and expect it to fight back instead of having to nurture it to bring out its best properties.

Flavors: Smoke, Sweet, Tobacco, Vegetal

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 8 g 4 OZ / 130 ML
JC

I’ve had a few like this. You feel at home with them. The ones I have to fiddle too much with I end up inadvertently avoiding(too much work when I just want to relax and enjoy).

Roughage

I know what you mean. With the more difficult teas, I tend to wait until I am in the right mood. That usually means finding a rare moment when I can actually sit down and focus solely on the tea. This does mean that they tend to get ignored a lot.

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