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2010 Spring Jade Dragon - Yunnan Green Tea

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by LadyLondonderry
Average preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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  • “I got a sample of this with an order a while back and was surprised to realized I hadn't logged it. I think Greg's description gives a good sense of this tea--nutty and toasty, sweet and grassy,...” Read full tasting note
    84
    teaddict 311 tasting notes

From Norbu Tea

This extraordinary green tea comes from Tengchong county in the Baoshan Prefecture of Yunnan. Tengchong is in the far west of Yunnan on the border with Myanmar, and is very well known as the center of the jade & jadeite trade in the region. It was grown at an altitude of approximately 8,200 ft (2,500 M) near a village known locally as “Village of the Returning Dragon.”

Our Jade Dragon is a traditional Yunnan green tea, which is characterized by a quick, high temperature wok firing step in processing which creates a unique look, penetrating aroma and flavor.

This tea is comprised of a mix of very tender young leaves and buds. The dry tea really looks frosted or perhaps “dusty,” and the aroma of the dry leaves is remarkably fruity and “toasty” at the same time. When infused, the liquor is quite aromatic when compared to green teas that are fired in a lower temperature wok, and the assertively toasty and fruity notes balance nicely with the grassy, more typically “green tea” type aroma. The flavor of this tea is nutty with toasty & fruity undertones balanced with the grassy, pleasantly bitter flavors typical of other green teas. It has a great and assertive Hui Gan (bittersweet aftertaste) that becomes apparent quickly after tasting.

The flavor of this tea is more assertive than other green teas, and can become overly bitter if steeped at too high a temperature or for too long. To start out, I would recommend steeping this tea at 160 to 170 Fahrenheit (slightly lower than normal for Chinese green tea) for about 3 minutes. As with all teas, adjust the time and temperature to your own personal taste (if you like a stronger tasting green tea, use more tea and/or a higher temperature, etc).

About Norbu Tea View company

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1 Tasting Note

84
311 tasting notes

I got a sample of this with an order a while back and was surprised to realized I hadn’t logged it. I think Greg’s description gives a good sense of this tea—nutty and toasty, sweet and grassy, oddly Dragon Well-like. and definitely a potential for bitterness so I keep it cool. Tonight brewing in a medium gaiwan, about 100mL per infusion, with about 3 grams of tea, first infusion at 30 seconds was delicious. Mmm. I generally like my 2nd infusions of green teas to be very short, because the freshly wetted leaves seem primed to let bitter elements out quickly if I don’t, but on this one tonight I was careless, and went more than minute for the second infusion—often a recipe for a wasted infusion. This one was a touch unpleasant at first sip, but a 50% dilution with more hot water and voila, back to the lovely tea I remember. Nice flexible tea.

A previous gongfu session went about 6 infusions before I lost the good tastes and started over with the rest of the sample.

Preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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