Fuding Ye Fang Bai Cha - 2011 Spring Fujian Semi-Wild White Tea

Tea type
White Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by teaddict
Average preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 2 min, 30 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I'm drinking the 2012 version of it this morning, but I do have a slight stomachache, so I'm going to hold off on rating this for a while. I was in the mood for something gentle. 1st steep: The...” Read full tasting note
    78
    amyoh2 2337 tasting notes
  • “First time drinking this one. Free sample included with a large recent order. 3 grams, six ounce glass pot, water 150 degrees 60"--probably a little short, given the small quantity of leaf--but...” Read full tasting note
    88
    teaddict 311 tasting notes

From Norbu Tea

Harvest: Spring, 2011
Varietal: Semi-Wild Growing Fuding White Varietal
Growing Region: Fuding County, Ningde Pref., Fujian

Our Fuding Ye Fang Bai Cha comes from Fuding county in northern Fujian Province, which is the historical home and center of white tea production using the traditional White Tea Cultivars.

The plantation this tea comes from was abandoned at some point during China’s period of great upheaval in the mid-20th Century, and it was basically left alone and untended until recently, which is why we are describing this tea as semi-wild or “Ye Fang.” The Chinese term “Ye Fang” (野放 / yě fàng) roughly means “released into the wild,” and in this case means it comes from a formerly cultivated but abandoned Fuding white tea varietal garden.

This tea was harvested in early April, 2011 and was processed simply but very carefully into this beautiful finished product. White tea making is a simple process. Essentially, the young, tender new growth buds and smaller leaves are hand picked and then simply withered before a final drying using low heat ovens. The withering process ideally starts out in direct or slightly diffused sunlight if the weather is appropriately cool and dry, and then the tea is brought indoors into a climate controlled facility so that the withering can be completed in a steady, controlled environment without having to worry about inconsistent light & heat levels from the sun. All white tea undergoes some oxidation as a result of plucking and handling of the leaves before drying, so, at all points during the processing of white tea, the leaves have to be handled carefully to avoid bruising them and allowing for unwanted or excessive oxidation that could negatively impact the subtle flavor, aroma and appearance of the finished tea.

The appearance of our Ye Fang Bai Cha is a beautiful mix of small leaf and bud material, primarily made up of one bud & the top two leaves from the tea plants. The dry leaf is a beautiful light golden color with a large portion of fuzzy little buds and small leaf material. The liquor is also a beautiful pale golden color with a light floral aroma that reminds me a bit of fresh squash blossoms. The infused liquor has a light-to-medium thick body, and the flavor is mild, vegetal & sweet with a lightly floral element that seems to go on for ever in the aftertaste. It is a very unique tea, and I hope you enjoy it!

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3 Tasting Notes

78
2337 tasting notes

I’m drinking the 2012 version of it this morning, but I do have a slight stomachache, so I’m going to hold off on rating this for a while. I was in the mood for something gentle.

1st steep: The wet leaves after steeping smell floral and almost buttery to me. The lea liquor is slightly vegetal but also has a fruity note of apricots and a bit of almond, perhaps. This was at 3 minutes or so at 205F. Overall very pleasant, but I can’t say I’ve met too many white teas I am not fond of (unless flavored/scented), they are a reliable favorite for me.

2nd steep: slightly less time and lower water temp. I still feel like this is nutty with a vegetal flavor. Definitely less sweet than some other white teas like bai mu dan, but still quite enjoyable.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 0 sec
ScottTeaMan

I’m just finishing up my Fuding White Treasure from Upton’s that is very enjoyable. This one sounds good too. I like the way Norbu describes this tea and the withering process.

TeaBrat

It’s amazing to think of how much care and effort goes into a simple cup of tea!

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88
311 tasting notes

First time drinking this one. Free sample included with a large recent order.

3 grams, six ounce glass pot, water 150 degrees

60"—probably a little short, given the small quantity of leaf—but delicious infusion, floral, sweet, fruity, like drinking peaches, very nice

165 degrees and probably 3 minutes—got distracted, but it’s good to ‘push’ a tea on first testing, right? Still quite tasty, fruity, stronger than I really prefer, but nothing unpleasant revealed by the overlong infusion.

180 degrees and several minutes again, liquor is becoming light amber, quite floral and fruity still, though not so strong or sweet as at first. I like this quite a lot. I kept at it for a few more extended infusions, and it gradually faded very pleasantly.

The iced version was also very good. I put some of this in the shopping cart for my next order.

Preparation
150 °F / 65 °C 1 min, 0 sec

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