Bai Hao Yin Zhen - Fujian White Tea - Spring 2012

Tea type
White Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Sil
Average preparation
170 °F / 76 °C 2 min, 0 sec 13 oz / 375 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “sipdown on this one as i'm passing the other half on to one of my tea friends whose preferences run towards white/green etc... ie the full other end of the spectrum from me haha. It's not because...” Read full tasting note
    78
    Silaena 4738 tasting notes
  • “Enjoying a first set of infusions with this tea, which has a very lively, fruity aroma even as dry leaves, and a very typical silver needle appearance. I didn't measure the leaf quantity used, but...” Read full tasting note
    82
    teaddict 311 tasting notes
  • “1.5 tbsp Very robust white tea flavour. Celery note. Strong floral note in scent of dry leaf does not seem to have been translated in the flavour” Read full tasting note
    73
    Rarity 439 tasting notes

From Norbu Tea

Harvest: Spring, 2012
Varietal: Da Bai Hao
Growing Region: Fuding County, Ningde Pref., Fujian
Grade: AAA

Overview:
Our Bai Hao Yin Zhen hails from the historical center of White tea cultivation, Fuding County in Northern Fujian Province. It is comprised entirely of hand picked, young first harvest buds from the “Da Bai Hao” (Large White Fur/Hair) tea cultivar indigenous to Fuding.

Bai Hao Yin Zhen literally translates to “white fur/hair silver needle,” in reference to the striking amount of silvery-white fuzzy hairs that cover the surface of the delicate, needle-shaped tea buds. When wet, the leaf buds reveal themselves to be a beautiful & healthy light green, which is a wonderful and striking visual contrast to the fuzzy, almost “dusty” white appearance of the buds when dry.

Appearance, Flavor & Aroma:
The processing of white tea is quite straightforward. It is simply picked, carefully withered in the sun and/or indoors in a climate controlled environment and then dried. This very simple processing creates a very mild but distinctive finished product that, when steeped, allows the subtle but distinctive vegetal/floral aroma and flavor elements unique to the Da Bai Hao tea cultivar to take center stage in the cup. The infused liquor is a lovely pale yellow that feels fairly light bodied in the mouth. It delivers a lovely subtly sweet flavor with hints of super-fresh green vegetables and mild floral elements. The aftertaste is surprisingly mouth-coating, sweet & long lasting for such a mild, sweet tea.

Steeping Guidelines:
This tea is quite is difficult to make unpleasant when steeping. It works beautifully steeped Gong Fu style in a gaiwan, equally beautifully “Grandpa Style” just loose in a tall glass with hot water, or it responds well to a longer western style treatment in a larger teapot with a longer steeping time. If you are not comfortable steeping tea using a Gaiwan or small Gong Fu type teapot, just use a heaping tablespoon of leaves per cup in your favorite teapot, and steep in 175F water for 5-6 minutes before serving.

About Norbu Tea View company

Company description not available.

3 Tasting Notes

78
4738 tasting notes

sipdown on this one as i’m passing the other half on to one of my tea friends whose preferences run towards white/green etc… ie the full other end of the spectrum from me haha. It’s not because i don’t like this either, but more because i like to share. Staving student with no tea budget and all you know :) As far as white’s go, this is a lovely light, refreshing brew with no floral notes going on! it’s sweet, and tastes more than just warm water to me haha overall another nice one from Norbu :)

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82
311 tasting notes

Enjoying a first set of infusions with this tea, which has a very lively, fruity aroma even as dry leaves, and a very typical silver needle appearance. I didn’t measure the leaf quantity used, but started with just a little, because I know these teas can be overwhelming if brewed concentrated. The wetted leaf takes up about 1/4 or 1/3 of the gaiwan.

The steeped tea (now on my 6th infusion) lives up to the promise of the leaf scent. Floral, fruity, sweet in the early infusions, a little more tart later one. Delicious stuff. I have taken it from about 30 seconds/150 degrees first infusion through a minute or two/195 degrees by the 6th, gradually increasing time and temperature, but this is such a good natured tea that I could do it casually without fear of bitterness or astringency breaking out.

This is in contrast to some silver needles I bought a while back at my local teashop, which tasted a bit musty from day one, and show a pronounced bitterness if not handled with a very light touch. This is a nicer grade of tea.

I almost forgot to add a very important feature of this tea: it pairs magnificently with small quantities of very intense, fruity dark chocolate, like Scharffenberger’s 70%.

Preparation
150 °F / 65 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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73
439 tasting notes

1.5 tbsp

Very robust white tea flavour. Celery note. Strong floral note in scent of dry leaf does not seem to have been translated in the flavour

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 3 min, 30 sec 5 tsp 13 OZ / 375 ML

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