Ali Shan Hong Cha - Taiwan Black Tea - Fall, 2012

Tea type
Black Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by NofarS
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  • “Drank this earlier this week and realized that something about older black teas is not as appealing to older oolong. Most of the oolong that are not reroasted tend to lose that roasty head and...” Read full tasting note
    Proust614 836 tasting notes

From Norbu Tea

This Black Tea (Hong Cha) comes from the Alishan Scenic Area in Southwest Taiwan’s Chiayi County. As with all of our tea from Ali Shan, we work exclusively with one family who live in Dabang Village in the portion of Alishan Township reserved exclusively for Taiwan’s Tsou indigenous ethnic group. After well over a year of refining their production methodology, the family made this first publicly available black tea production from the 2012 fall harvest for sale only on Norbutea.com! By the way, I had the privilege of tasting most of the test productions over the past year, and this one is by far my favorite…which is why we bought all of it!

This tea was produced from Qing Xin (Green Heart) varietal tea plants, which are known in Taiwan as “Qing Xin Oolong” or just “Oolong.” Just so there is not too much confusion, even though the name of the varietal used to produce this tea is “Qing Xin Oolong”, it is a black tea (Hong Cha).

The plantation where this tea was grown lies in the hills above Dabang Village at an altitude of 1,200+/- Meters (4,000+/- feet), and it was harvested in October during the Fall harvest season of 2012.

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1 Tasting Note

836 tasting notes

Drank this earlier this week and realized that something about older black teas is not as appealing to older oolong. Most of the oolong that are not reroasted tend to lose that roasty head and stronger body, all while creating a refined caramel taste. Black teas as they age seem to just lose some strength and astringency.What I get ut of trying this, which was still alright, is that what I should probably look for is a 3 to 5 year old CTC, Ceylon, or Assam tea to see if they lose the astringency and bitterness.
This tea brew up rather easy and I thought it was an oolong because of the date on it, not very often does a black come to me over 2 years old. Brewed this one up 4 times before I quit it, nothing that important struck me with this though :/

aardvarkcheeselog

I’ve been thinking about trying to store some red tea for a few years. My ideas have been more along the lines of autumn Darjeeling or dianhong.

Liquid Proust

Dianhong goes flat :( Darjeeling would be a good idea though. I’ve been curious about Assam because of the Drunk on Red cakes.

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