Sencha of the Autumn Moon

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Shinobi_cha
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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From Obubu Tea

Otsukimi (お月見) literally means “moon viewing” and is closely associated with Japanese festivals celebrating the moon in Autumn. It is at this time of the year when the moon appears brightest, and Japanese eat certain dishes such as tsukimi dango (round, white dumplings), edamame (soybeans), Japanese chestnuts, etc.

Our Otsukimi Sencha or Sencha of the Autumn Moon was named after this Japanese tradition not only because we harvest it in late September when the festivals occur, but also because the tea leaves and stems produce a bright yellow-green sencha with a round flavor.

Product name: Sencha of the Autumn Moon
Ingredients: 100% aracha from Wazuka, Kyoto
Tea plant: Yabukita, 20 years old
Cultivation notes: Open air
Harvest period: October
Processing notes: Light steaming (30 sec)
Product size: 1 bag (24.5 x11.5 x2.0 cm / 9.65 x4.53 x0.79 in)
Weight of contents: 100 g / 3.53 oz
Producer: Akihiro Kita
Expiration: Good for 6 months from shipment
Storage: Seal tightly and refrigerate

About Obubu Tea View company

Company description not available.

7 Tasting Notes

96
6770 tasting notes

I think this is REALLY incredible! This has all of the ‘right amounts’ of all of the stereotypical green flavors in it without any one flavor dominating the others. It leaves a sweeter after taste that is really wonderful!

If you were to put the song “I’m a little bit Country – I’m a little bit Rock N Roll” up against this tea…well. it would be the tea equivalent to that song!

A little bit of EVERYTHING GOOD in a Green Tea! Totally YUM!

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75
280 tasting notes

This tea surprised me. After I decanted the pot, I sniffed the brewed leaves, and it instantly brought back a flood of memories.
You know how certain smells are strongly connected to memories or emotions? Well, this reminded me of when I lived in Hong Kong…. I don’t know if it was the smell of a HK bakery, or mochi, or dim sum, but the aroma was very good and I couldn’t help but continue to sniff and figure out why it felt so familiar.

Surprisingly, the leaves of this tea are very light green/yellowish and tiny. I could have sworn this was a fukamushi, as the leaves are only a little larger than dust. I thought this could be a fukamushi bancha, though, I’ve never heard of such a thing. (I don’t know the difference between bancha and a 2nd or 3rd harvest sencha… does anyone else?)

EDIT I wasn’t quite able to finish my thoughts on this.

I’m really surprised about the size of the leaves, because it’s just lightly steamed.
I would say I enjoyed this tea, but there wasn’t much depth to the flavor. Not sweet, nor bitter; slightly astringent, with the main flavor being a perhaps a little grassy or like sweet rice (which, as you know, isn’t really sweet). I think I enjoyed it because there wasn’t anything wrong with it, and the aroma was so connected to those memories. Nevertheless, it wasn’t very exciting or a flavor I would go seek out (especially to buy it from Japan). If I saw it in my local grocery store, then perhaps I’d pick some up.

Preparation
175 °F / 79 °C 0 min, 30 sec
Shadowleaf

As far as I have heard, the main difference between bancha and sencha is that bancha leaves are usually brown, have a taste more similar to houjicha than sencha and was traditionally grown in people’s gardens rather than a plantation. Usually, it is seen as a more low quality tea than normal sencha. I have found this often to be true when I shop at Japanese supermarkets.

Bancha is often translated to commoner’s tea, but it is not too incorrect to translate it into everyday tea, as bancha was the tea people would drink everyday instead of just water. This tradition is said to be dated back to over a thousand years ago, as clean, safe water was hard to find in both China and Japan, one would boil the water first, and often make tea. (In Europe we made wine, beer and similar beverages)

Thus the culture and way of raising and making bancha varies a lot from area to area, but in the recent 50 years, I guess, many big companies have now taken over this production and bancha has moved out from people’s homes to plantations. The variations of bancha is still very big. There are indeed green types as well, as many raise bancha from the late summer and to the late autumn. That is why some high grade banchas have different “flushes”, depending on when they were harvested in this period. (三番、四番 and so on). A lot of green banchas are also more aged sencha with less caffeine and more tannin.

And, I am only guessing now, but it sounds reasonable for a lot of tea companies wanting to still sell a lot of tea during this autumn season as the three main flushes of shincha is of out season now. As a result of this one might use many creative ways of selling bancha, including what you, Shinobicha, guessed could be a fukamushi bancha. I actually found one here: http://www.e-cha.co.jp/fs/sugamo/jt182

Why Obubu Tea would label this as sencha in the first place sounds weird to me as it is described as light steamed aracha. Maybe a mail to the tea vendor could bring some good answers. I will do some research on my own here, because finding the right label for Japanese tea has proven to be quite hard for me as I discover more and more Japanese teas.

Phew. What a long comment. Hope you found it at least a bit useful.

Shinobi_cha

That’s really interesting, thanks for sharing!
Yeah, I am sure you are right, that it is a way for them to sell some of the ni-ban or san-ban harvests. What I don’t know is why it LOOKS like a fukamushi, when they put on the website it’s an asamushi… I should definitely ask them and find out.

I agree, the more I learn about Japanese teas, the harder they seem to label/classify!

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86
4366 tasting notes

I really enjoyed this Sencha. Rather than the sweet, buttery notes that I sometimes get from a Sencha, I am getting an interesting bittersweet taste with a nutty undertone. The taste is fresh and exhilarating.

Very nice!

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85
100 tasting notes

The aroma of the dry leaves and stems is very pleasant, with a grassy vegetal quality that is reminiscent of fresh cut hay and autumn breezes. The stems in my sample were quite prominent, and sturdier than those in the Yanagi Bancha sample I had tried previously, but the leaves were very fine, and a beautiful dark green.

Using my kyusu I did three extractions of this sample, all using approximately 3.5 ounces of water:
1st steep: 45 seconds at 180 F
2nd steep: a quick steep of only about 10 seconds at 180 F
3rd steep: 30 seconds at 180 F

The wet leaves have an amazing aroma, unlike any sencha I have tried before. An almost peppery quality like mustard greens, but this does not come through in the tea. All three infusions were of similar quality in being a bright yellow green, clear, refreshing and well balanced. There are some nice grassy undertones and a softness that is similar to many spring time pickings.

This would make a nice accompaniment to almost any meal, but is very pleasant to drink all alone. Another very nice tea from Obubu. :)

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 45 sec
Kashyap

I’m drinking the Obubu Kabuse sencha this morning myself…lovely, creamy, buttery, sweet and vegetal….

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60
255 tasting notes

Compared to the spring and summer, I didn’t like this like this tea as much. Lots of twigs, so I was interested in the flavor. I felt it was more bitter than the other samples I’ve had so far. Grassy. It was just simple.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 30 sec

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