2013 Spring, Lishan: Cui Luan Light Roast Oolong - 輕培梨山翠巒烏龍

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Cody
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C

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  • “This is a great example of _gao shan_ oolong with traditional style. I found the Cui Luan Lishan to be unique in its roasted qualities, which were very well integrated with the leaves'...” Read full tasting note
    Cody 64 tasting notes

From Origin Tea

Harvest / Production Date: 8th of May 2013 (Spring)
Region: Lishan, North Cui Luan tea production region
Elevation: +/- 2200 meters
Picking: Hand Picked
Oxidation: Medium-Light
Roast: Light

From the same teamaker as our 2013 Spring, Da Yu Ling 102K, this high altitude oolong was processed in a slightly more traditional style, a touch heavier on oxidation and roast but still retaining crisp high mountain taste.

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1 Tasting Note

64 tasting notes

This is a great example of gao shan oolong with traditional style.

I found the Cui Luan Lishan to be unique in its roasted qualities, which were very well integrated with the leaves’ properties and did not overpower in flavor. However, I found the aromas and flavors to be less powerful than the other two Lishan samples (Hua Gang and Shan Lin Xi), especially in the dry leaves’ scent, which was a fresh and floral base and undertones of the roast. The aroma of the leaves sitting in the heated gaiwan was the kicker, however. Rich roasted almonds and hints of stone fruit. Floral qualities became subdued, though were not lost completely.

The liquor had strong roasted-green qualities with a depth of flinty sweetness. It had a tendency to become a bit too tart for my tastes, although it transferred into a very nice, strong and thick aftertaste, with a lingering salivation and very few drying characteristics. More of my attention was drawn to the powerful throaty coolness (more than the Shan Lin Xi, but less intense than the Hua Gang, although the Cui Luan’s cooling lasted much longer throughout steeps). The empty cup was thick with a hefty roasted barly and caramel scent. As far as the form went, it was fairly basic. Each sip produced a steady rise through the opening into the development in both flavor and mouthfeel, granting a medium complexity. The finish, as mentioned above, was most noteworthy, given its length, strong mouthfeel and aftertaste, and potent sensations.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C

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