Lapsang Souchong

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Smoke, Campfire
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Erik Dabel
Average preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec 48 oz / 1419 ml

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10 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Going to take a sharp left with this one today. I used it for sun tea. Yeah, that' s right, a Lapsang Souchong sun tea. Had to at least try it. How did it come out? Pretty exactly how you...” Read full tasting note
    85
    Erik 69 tasting notes

From Red Blossom Tea Company

Lapsangsouchong originated during the tumult of the Taiping Rebellion, a civil war that waged through southern China from 1850 to 1864. While in the Wuyi Mountains, Taiping soldiers used bags of maocha, or unfinished tea, as resting cushions. Their weight crushed and damaged the leaves, encouraging the oxidation that transformed the leaves into a black tea. In an effort to stop the oxidation, the leaves were pan roasted and smoked with pine needles – imparting the unique smokiness for which this tea is known.

“Lapsang” is a reference to the Wuyi Mountains in Fujian. “Souchong” means “small leaf variety”, a cultivar related to Wuyi Yancha oolongs.

Rich and robust, with a distinct smoky aroma, and mild sweetness in a rich red liquor.

About Red Blossom Tea Company View company

Company description not available.

10 Tasting Notes

85
69 tasting notes

Going to take a sharp left with this one today. I used it for sun tea.

Yeah, that’ s right, a Lapsang Souchong sun tea. Had to at least try it.

How did it come out? Pretty exactly how you would expect. I thought the much longer steeping time at much lower temperatures would hold down the intensity and bring out a better balance. It did, a bit. This batch did get a pretty good balance between the piney campfire taste and the black tea base. But it still tastes like campfire.

Like, the 2nd morning camping when you wake up and realize that you set up your tent directly downwind from your campfire and stayed up late drinking and burning all the wood you brought, continuously filling your tent with that piney woodsy campfire smoke.

Mmmmmm….

But seriously, it is actually really good. I do like it. And the final product after leaving it in the sun for all the day long was a really poppy, woodsy, pine smoky black tea that actually has a decent balance. The natural tea flavors were able to pop out.

Not the best sun tea I’ve had, but certainly one I would do again.

Preparation
18 tsp 80 OZ / 2365 ML

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