Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

Zhu Ye Qing (Green Bamboo)

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Cary
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 2 min, 0 sec

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

1 Want it Want it

0 Own it Own it

1 Tasting Note View all

From Seven Cups

Sichuan province has a long history of tea production and two of Sichuan’s mountains (Meng Ding Shan and E Mei Shan) are known to produce some of the best green tea. Zhu Ye Qing originated on E Mei Shan, at a temple called Wang Nian Si. In 1964, a visiting general named Chen Yi was served some of this tea. He enjoyed it so much that he asked the name of the tea. The monks told him it had not been named yet, and asked him to name the tea. He looked at the bright green tea leaves floating straight up in the water and thought they looked like fresh bamboo leaves. He named the tea Zhu Ye Qing (Green Bamboo).

Today much of the Zhu Ye Qing is produced on nearby Meng Ding Shan, where the climate is better and there is more space for growing tea. Our Zhu Ye Qing is completely handmade, and the dry leaves are slightly flattened from the pressure of the tea master’s hand as he dries the tea in a hot wok. The tea is picked in early April when the first leaf is just beginning to open from the bud, resulting in a very high nutritional content. The aroma is refreshing, like walking through a bamboo forest in the morning. Zhu Ye Qing is appreciated for its rich, slightly vegetal flavor and lack of bitterness.

Tea Origin: Sichuan Province, China
Tea Bush: Ming Shan #9
Tea Master: Pan De Yong
Harvest Time: March
Picking Standard: over 80% tea buds with young leaves

Brewing Guidelines
Teaware: 12 oz. glass or porcelain pot
Amount: ¾ Tbs of tea leaves
Water: 185°F filtered water
Infusion: First infusion at least 2 minutes. The leaves are good for 5 infusions. Add a little more time for each subsequent infusion.

Note: This tea was formerly named Meng Ding Cui Zhu.

About Seven Cups View company

Company description not available.

1 Tasting Note

60
8 tasting notes

Smooth and clean tasting. Refreshing. Not very complex. Very cool that’s it’s all buds…no open leaves. Good tea to turn on new green tea drinkers.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 2 min, 0 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.