2007 Wild Arbor King

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by the_skua
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  • “Here, I find a tea unlike much of the smaller producer tea I have been drinking of late. As evidenced by the photo of steeped leaves above, there is variability in production that leaves this tea a...” Read full tasting note
    72
    the_skua 207 tasting notes

From Shuanjiang Mengku

A new product for 2006, this quickly became Mengku’s most popular relase of 2006 after winning the Expo Tea Award in Kunming. Raw material is from “bingdao” (literally Ice Island) an area in the county of Mengku well-known for its pungent strong teas. Teas from Bing Dao were fradulently sold as Ban Zhang teas in 2006 and 2007 due to its similarity to expensive Ban Zhang tea. A great tea with excellent aging potential!

Product Name: Mengku “Qiao Mu Wang” Raw cake

Ingredients: Sun-dried and blended Mengku area Pu-erh tea Produced by Mengku Tea Factory

About Shuanjiang Mengku View company

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1 Tasting Note

72
207 tasting notes

Here, I find a tea unlike much of the smaller producer tea I have been drinking of late. As evidenced by the photo of steeped leaves above, there is variability in production that leaves this tea a little simple. I appreciate its firm bitter grip, it’s opening sweetness, and pungent sun-dried character. However, I find it too heavy on the stemmy greenness familiar to plantation tea, oligosaccharides, and distant oxidized black or white tea notes. There is certainly not much wrong with this tea, I am just searching for a beckoning depth, and it’s not there.

Full blog post: http://tea.theskua.com/?p=408

cultureflip

can you describe oligosaccharides and how they affect the flavor of tea?

the_skua

The use of oligosaccharides here is just a generic term for complex sugar, generally related the legumes and some starchy vegetables. I think a lot of people use the word “beany” but I don’t really think that covers the character very well.

cultureflip

that makes sense. thare are times i find an “edamame” quality in some tea.

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