China Black (Yunnan) Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Nicole
Average preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Thank you so much for this one, Nicole! Only Nicole and I have reviewed this one so far? Hmm. Yunnan is my new favorite... but I'm not sure if there is a strict flavor difference between the...” Read full tasting note
    95
    Tea Sipper 1283 tasting notes
  • “We had this today with Christmas brunch. It went very well with the food. A basic, solid black. No astringency with a weighty body. I picked up this one since I had really enjoyed the Golden Yunnan...” Read full tasting note
    89
    nburriss 511 tasting notes

From Simpson & Vail

Yunnan, known as the birthplace of tea, is a province in southwestern China that borders Vietnam, Burma, and Laos. Yunnan translates literally to “south of the clouds”. Its diverse landscape offers everything from tropical rainforests to mountainous terrain and is home to a wide variety of plant species. The Yunnan region focuses heavily on agricultural production.

Yunnan teas are particularly delightful as breakfast or early afternoon teas.

The slender, well-formed, tightly rolled, jet-black leaves of this China black tea yield an amber cup with a brisk, full-bodied and well rounded taste.

About Simpson & Vail View company

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3 Tasting Notes

95
1283 tasting notes

Thank you so much for this one, Nicole! Only Nicole and I have reviewed this one so far? Hmm. Yunnan is my new favorite… but I’m not sure if there is a strict flavor difference between the golden yunnan and the black yunnan. After steeping for four-five minutes, this one is medium bodied. It tastes more like a ploughed field of hay (in that delightful tea-like way) than anything chocolatey. It has a tiny bit of maltiness to it, but the flavor isn’t dark and deep enough to have too much of a malty flavor. Are these the differences between golden and black yunnans? I don’t know. I just found out today that not all yunnans are golden. The steep color is a lovely shade of amber, after all!

The second steep at boiling for six minutes was certainly more like my favorite tea flavor.. deeper, chocolatey and maltier. So you can certainly tailor this (or any tea, really) to your tastes. So the first cup had the lightness of a darjeeling, but the second had a much stronger flavor. I like the differences! And I guess I answered my own question.. the black yunnan can certainly still be deep and malty — it’s all in the time and temp.

Preparation
Boiling 6 min, 0 sec
Starfevre

I love yunnans and this is certainly an interesting tip about steeping that I did not know about this tea, so thanks.

Terri HarpLady

I love yunnans as well!

TeaBrat

sounds good!

Nicole

Not sure about golden vs non golden but I do find I prefer the goldens. They seem maltier. But maybe I just need to steep differently.

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89
511 tasting notes

We had this today with Christmas brunch. It went very well with the food. A basic, solid black. No astringency with a weighty body. I picked up this one since I had really enjoyed the Golden Yunnan from Republic of Tea during my last vacation.

Overall, I think I prefer the Golden Yunnan teas. They seem to be maltier to my taste. I have been using Kally Tea’s Royal Golden Yunnan as my breakfast tea at work (and I’ll need to review it before it’s all gone…) and while this Yunnan is good, I don’t think I’d choose it over a Golden. I probably won’t replace this when it runs out but it has been a nice tea to have around.

I hope everyone had a good Christmas day!

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 45 sec

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