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Ali Shan

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by sophistre
Average preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I find that I can't really begin to get the writing engine turned over in the morning until I've had a cup of black tea, with all of the brain-jolting caffeine it contains...but I've also found...” Read full tasting note
    91
    sophistre 158 tasting notes
  • “A very tasty tea. Buttery, honeyed, and a bit floral, the dreamy creamy tea pleases all the way down. It's one of my favorites right now. The aroma is great right when you tilt the gaiwan lid. It...” Read full tasting note
    85
    OolongLily 19 tasting notes

From Tao of Tea

Origin: Alishan, Taiwan

Plucking Season: Spring

Introduction: Alishan is a range of 18 mountains located in central Taiwan. The region is famous for its dense cloud cover and beautiful peaks. Ancient stands of cypress and brilliant cherry trees are inhabited by a plethora of birds and wildlife.
Alishan is one of Taiwan’s best known tea growing regions and famous for its Gao Shan Cha “high mountain tea”. Due to its elevation and cooler climate, the leaf grows slower attaining a higher concentration of sap and essential oils which contribute to the tea’s flavor and aroma.
This is a roasted Alishan, giving a warm, toasty depth to the floral, honey-like aroma and flavor.

Sun Withering
In making Alishan oolong only the newly sprouted leaves are plucked. They are then ‘withered’ in the sun (weather permitting) or indoors on special bamboo trays for a few hours to reduce moisture.

Traditional Rolling
Once a suitable suppleness is achieved in the leaves, traditional rolling techniques (which include wrapping the leaves in cloth and binding it tightly into ball shape) are applied in conjunction with light roasting in a rotating tunnel roaster. Successive re-rolling and re-roastings are done to achieve the optimum shape and flavor. A final roast is given to complete the processing.

Judging Quality
Apart from elevation, season and age of the plants, oolongs can be evaluated by the quality of leaf and the processing art. The leaves should be tightly rolled and should not crumble with gentle pressure (crumbled leaf is a sign of over-roasting or stale leaf)

Flavor Profile: Deep, roasted, wild-honey-like aroma and flavor. Enough roasting to give depth, yet without disturbing the more subtle, sweet floral qualities of the tea.

About Tao of Tea View company

Company description not available.

2 Tasting Notes

91
158 tasting notes

I find that I can’t really begin to get the writing engine turned over in the morning until I’ve had a cup of black tea, with all of the brain-jolting caffeine it contains…but I’ve also found that my body is happier if I ease into my day with something gentler than that. Oolongs and whites have become my default, but oolongs particularly: they are rich enough that I often feel I’ve eaten breakfast.

Among the many kinds of oolong in all of their glorious variety, Ali Shan is one of the most rewardingly aromatic. I could sit (and have sat) for full minutes with my nose buried in the cup, inhaling the way they smell.

This one I got as a one ounce sample from Tao of Tea (somewhat expensive compared to their other teas at 7.25 an ounce! Thank goodness for their frequent buyer program). I stick pretty closely to a 1tsp/8oz. setup, and always use my 16oz cup; I got to have plenty of cups of this — it resteeps well even at that quantity of water. Obviously I am lazy — I never once wrote a tasting note.

I don’t think that this shatters the mold in terms of the type of tea that it is, but it is a very good Ali Shan. I prefer this tea to the Four Seasons I have (which is comparable as a green oolong, if not necessarily exactly the same). You have a light honey scent, with a delicious, welcoming depth of flavor (I tend to think of the smell of baked potato, but I’m not sure that’s completely accurate — still, something about it says ‘starch’ to me), and a pleasant floral high end.

I should really spend more time trying more Ali Shan.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 2 min, 45 sec

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85
19 tasting notes

A very tasty tea. Buttery, honeyed, and a bit floral, the dreamy creamy tea pleases all the way down. It’s one of my favorites right now. The aroma is great right when you tilt the gaiwan lid. It just punches you in the face with awesome. Good for many many steeps depending on how you brew. I’ll be keeping this stocked in my cupboard.

Full Review: http://www.tea-tank.com/?p=10

Preparation
185 °F / 85 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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