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Fenghuang Dan Cong Magnolia Fragrance Winter 2011

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Cody
Average preparation
190 °F / 87 °C

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  • “A most fantastic dan cong, and something new to me. This tea went through a very light roasting without any charcoal roasting. The result is fantastic. No flavor was compromised and instead a...” Read full tasting note
    89
    Cody 64 tasting notes

From Tea Trekker

Love naturally aromatic teas? Try this tea and we think that you will love it as much as we do.

This leaf is large the way that dancongs should be, but the color is light green and features many gold highlights. This tea is very different looking from the dark brown/dark green colors of spring dancong.

Besides the appearance, what sets this winter-pluck dancong apart from our traditional spring-pluck dancongs is the extra degree of high aroma and the elimination of the charcoal firing taste. Not that we mind the deep, woodsy aromatics that charcoal firing imparts to the tea, but tasting this remarkable leaf sans charcoal brings a new layer of naturally-present sweetness and fragrance to the foreground.

When we visited Wu Dong Mountain, our tea colleagues told us that the spring tea is best for flavor and the fall harvest is best for high fragrance. They were certainly right about the fragrance, but this tea has a pleasing, luscious, pleasing flavor, too. The sweetness is reminiscent of honey, ripe stone fruits and a bouquet of orchids.

This tea is for tea enthusiasts who want tea in the lighter, fragrant, non-roasted oolong style such as Taiwan Baozhong, Tung Ting, and High Mountain gao shans; and our non-traditional ( non-roasted ) Tieguanyins and SeZhong oolongs such as Mao Xie, Ben Shan and Huang Jin Gui from China.

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1 Tasting Note

89
64 tasting notes

A most fantastic dan cong, and something new to me. This tea went through a very light roasting without any charcoal roasting. The result is fantastic. No flavor was compromised and instead a lovely, intoxicating floral notes of magnolia exploded through the liquor and the wet leaves. However, while definitely being a huge pro for this tea, it also has the potential to be this tea’s downfall. This dan cong becomes unbelievably astringent. Fast. Oversteep it for a couple seconds and it’s like your eating flowers. And not the ones that you’re supposed to eat. It just becomes really unpalatable. Also, it comes out in the mouthfeel as well. It’s a pretty “chewy” tea and I there is this waxiness throughout every steep (although in varying intensities). Interestingly, though, this transfers over into the aftertaste quite well. It’s pleasantly thick, very floral, with a honey sweetness.

I’m not going to discredit this one just for those flaws, though. Even though it’s pretty high-maintenance, I performed tons of steeps (upwards of 12) and it had some great complexity, even granting some spicy notes into the eighth steep. It has some fantastic flavors, melding fruit and floral notes nicely. It included some notes of kelp and nut, and also the greener spectrum of dan cong flavors. It all reminds me a bit of a dragonwell green mixed with a mi lan xiang dan cong. Besides the unbalance caused by the over-astringency, it became one of my favorite dan cong flavor profiles.

The leaves are also fantastic. They’re massive. Enormous. Probably the largest dried leaves of an oolong that I’ve had. They have great consistency in size, almost no broken pieces, no dust, and very fragrant, with aromas of dried fruits, berries, grasses, and honey. Although of inconsistent coloration dry, when wet, they show an even coloration of amber-brown and army green, nice patterns of bruising, and lovely looking veins glowing from the blades.

As this was from a small sample I received at the Tea Trekker store, I was grateful for the opportunity to try this tea, and it provided an excellent experience, even if it was a bit difficult to get right.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C

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