Wan Gong 2014 Spring

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by SWApilot
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 4 oz / 129 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “My experience with this tea represents a cautionary tale not to judge a raw pu-erh on one session or even the first couple of steeps in a session. One’s relationship with a sheng is a story...” Read full tasting note
    triumph 156 tasting notes
  • “One of those teas that instantly knocks your socks off and I wasn’t wearing any to begin with. Used a thin walled gaiwan, rinse and 10 minute stroll to feed the birds then steeps of...” Read full tasting note
    98
    BigDaddy 143 tasting notes
  • “Another excellent Pu’er from Eugene and Belle. In their words “… this Wangong cake is a stand out processing from the 2014 spring harvest” and are they ever correct. The...” Read full tasting note
    92
    swapilot 104 tasting notes

From Tea Urchin

Wan Gong village was abandoned a century ago after reputed cattle thieving led to a massacre of the local community, and now the trees grow in relative isolation, over 3 hours walk from Ding Jia Zhai and Gua Feng Zhai. Tea poaching used to be common here, until the trees were recently distributed between the neighboring villages.

Wan Gong 2014 Spring is honey sweet with an initial flavor of orchids, complex mid palate and finish. The mouth feel is voluptuously thick and smooth. Even if over steeped it will not become astringent. There is a clear but subtle floral aroma that emanates from the tea liquor. A clear stand out tea from our 2014 selection. Highly recommend!

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3 Tasting Notes

156 tasting notes

My experience with this tea represents a cautionary tale not to judge a raw pu-erh on one session or even the first couple of steeps in a session. One’s relationship with a sheng is a story that unfolds over time, with turning points, climaxes, different moods and tones.

When I first tried this tea I thought it was pleasant, a bit mild for my tastes perhaps, but clean and friendly. And that impression continued into the first two steeps of the latest session. But then something happened on the third steep that caused me to adjust my estimation of the Wan Gong. All of a sudden it became a little sweeter, thicker and duskier, with a juiciness you get from eating a red grapefruit.

It could be that I first tried this in the midst of drinking stronger teas and it got lost in the cacophony of those noisier teas. Anyway, this is a really well-processed, calming tea with beautiful leaves that has some surprises in store when you find its sweet spot.

It has taught me to soldier on with All the Light We Cannot See, a book that is a bit precious for my tastes but hopefully will hit some other notes and prove worthy of its considerable reputation.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec 7 g 4 OZ / 130 ML
mrmopar

I wasn’t too impressed by this one at first. Time to do another brew I see.

jschergen

This sums it up well for me too. I’ve had some very good sessions with this and a few others where it’s good, sweet, but less exciting.

JC

This is what I started doing about a year and a half ago (partly the reason I’m so bad at uploading notes now). I do at least three sessions with a tea before deciding how I feel about it. I’ve had teas blow me away the first time, to only feel somewhat bland later, then I’ve had some that never caught my attention but now turned into daily drinkers. This was the case with a cheaper jingmai that w2t had, mid aged very mellow. Now I’m trying to find it again and I can’t.

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98
143 tasting notes

One of those teas that instantly knocks your socks off and I wasn’t wearing any to begin with. Used a thin walled gaiwan, rinse and 10 minute stroll to feed the birds then steeps of 30/30/30/30/40/40/40/50/50/60/60/70/70/90/115/130/145/160 and so on. Liquor was thick pouring and on the tongue, with flavors starting out floral and then turning sweet. Not a trace of astringency, a slight bitterness but you have to be paying attention. The spent large leaves are all whole and uniform and as I looked in my strainer not a piece of broken leaf to be found. A most amazing tea, will be buying the whole cake next time.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 30 sec 10 g 4 OZ / 110 ML

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92
104 tasting notes

Another excellent Pu’er from Eugene and Belle. In their words “… this Wangong cake is a stand out processing from the 2014 spring harvest” and are they ever correct. The color of the soup is a beautiful golden color. The smell of the soup is an excellent floral and grassy combination that is a delight to smell. The taste is quite simply amazing. To my taste buds the soup has a very well balanced floral and grass flavor with just a hint of honey that comes out at the end. What really surprised me is just how smooth this Sheng is. After seven steepings there was absolutely no astringency and just the slightest hint of kuwei. My favorite part of this Sheng is the energy it exhibits. Here I am twenty minutes after my last sip and my tastes buds are still excited and I can actually still taste this wonderful tea.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 5 OZ / 147 ML

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