Da Hong Pao

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by JustJames
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “scribbles, you are a hero among everyday folk! this tea is the classy little black dress that every woman has in her wardrobe, but with a twist: along with this elegant slip the accessory is not...” Read full tasting note
    90
    JustJames 390 tasting notes
  • “I received this in a marvelous swap box from scribbles. Thank you so much!!! This is a nice dark oolong. It’s really metallic to my tastes, that’s not necessarily a...” Read full tasting note
    80
    Dexter 982 tasting notes
  • “This is not what I am used to drinking from a oolong tea. It doesn’t have that strong rock/mineral taste that I usually associate with oolongs. That doesn’t mean that I don’t like...” Read full tasting note
    85
    scribbles 286 tasting notes
  • “My weekend was excellent, even though my sleep schedule is totally off now! I enjoyed fighting games and worked on painting, who can ask for more? Sadly though, my happiness is at an end, sort of....” Read full tasting note
    SoggyEnderman 888 tasting notes

From Tealux

Big Red Robe (otherwise known as Da Hong Pao) is one of the famous 4 Wuyi bushes from Mount Wuyi in the Fujian province of China. It has been given the “King of all teas” during the Qing Dynasty.

Da Hong Pao oolong tea is famous for its unique floral fragrance and specially Wuyi rock tea taste and fragrance. All Wuyi rock Oolong tea has its unique rock tea taste and fragrance, which the other Oolong teas do not possess the characteristics. The rock tea taste and fragrance can be described in the four aspects: aroma, cleanness, sweetness and animation.

Though our this tea is from Ban Yan areas, This rare and flavorful long leaf has been oxidized for a sweet and aromatic treat.The first infusion creates a pleasant orange brew with a unique fruity, slightly smoky, sweet aroma. The taste is rich and smooth emitting a subtle fruity aftertaste. An aromatic, sweet flavor lingers on the tongue well after the last sip. The appearance of its tea leaves in dry leaf form onsists of dark, mostly erect tea leaves yielding a subtle fruity aroma and a hint of chocolate fragrance. It is a perfect choice for any new Wuyi oolong drinker.

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4 Tasting Notes

90
390 tasting notes

scribbles, you are a hero among everyday folk!

this tea is the classy little black dress that every woman has in her wardrobe, but with a twist: along with this elegant slip the accessory is not pearls or gold, but a cuban cigar. oh yes!

this is a simple black tea. almost purist but for the sweet, smoky taste of organic tobacco leaf. perfectly matched, beautifully balanced. it is not even remotely subtle with its caffeine punch, but it is very smooth.

thank you so much scribbles for sharing! i will meter this out and buy more when i’m done.

….. i wonder sometimes with the amount of tea i consume how it is that i sleep at all, lol.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 5 min, 0 sec
Fuzzy_Peachkin

I love your description of this! :-)

JustJames

it was honestly what came to mind as i sipped it, lol.

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80
982 tasting notes

I received this in a marvelous swap box from scribbles. Thank you so much!!!
This is a nice dark oolong. It’s really metallic to my tastes, that’s not necessarily a bad thing. This isn’t quite as smooth and gentle as some of them are, it’s a little rough around the edges. All in all a pretty good oolong.
I will have no problem finishing this sample. Dark oolongs always make me happy.
I did four flavorful successful steeps of this with no nastiness in later steeps. This tea had some nice staying power.
(Then I tried the other Da HOng Pao she sent me- tasting note to follow).

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85
286 tasting notes

This is not what I am used to drinking from a oolong tea. It doesn’t have that strong rock/mineral taste that I usually associate with oolongs. That doesn’t mean that I don’t like this. I do. Quite a lot, actually. The flavour is deeper, and very familiar, but I can’t quite pinpoint what I am tasting. Sweet. Smooth. Pleasing.

Dry aroma is sweet, fruity and nutty.

Second steeping holds flavour well.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 3 min, 0 sec

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888 tasting notes

My weekend was excellent, even though my sleep schedule is totally off now! I enjoyed fighting games and worked on painting, who can ask for more? Sadly though, my happiness is at an end, sort of. The basement has a hellish flooding problem, so there is going to be a lot of noise and a lot of mess this week, with the warning ‘anyone with lung problems shouldn’t be here.’ Bah. So I am going to spend a lot of time outside, meaning no painting, though I am going to hopefully spend a lot of time at the zoo.

Today I am looking at Tealyra’s Da Hong Pao Superfine, specifically it is a Ban Yan Da Hong Pao (because if it was Zheng Yan it would cost a small fortune) see the term Ban Yan comes from Ban Yan Cha, or semi-rock tea (as contrasted with Yan Cha) meaning it is grown outside of the Wuyi National Scenic Area. It is still a Wuyi ‘Yancha’ in style and spirit, but being grown outside of this rather fancy region means us mere mortals can afford it. Good for people who want to drink Da Hong Pao everyday and not as a special treat. So how do these long twisty leaves smell? Like a Da Hong Pao, strong notes of char and tobacco with undertones of cocoa and lots of loam. It smells like the remnants of a campfire on an autumn’s day, a campfire where someone was smoking a pipe and eating s’mores and the air still holds both of those memories.

Time to use ye’ol Yancha pot, and the aroma of the tea leaves is still fairly char heavy, giving the tea a sharpness. There are also notes of loam and black walnuts with a finish of wet limestone. Not terribly nuanced but certainly very strong. The liquid for the first steep has mellowed out a bit on the char, smelling like wet coals and molasses with an accompaniment of walnut shells and a very faint creamy candy note, not unlike molasses candies…something which I am craving suddenly.

The first steep is surprisingly mellow, it starts with a loamy mineral note, like wet limestone and damp autumn leaves after a rain and then bursts into molasses and scotch. The finish is loamy and gently sweet but does not linger long. It was a good first steep but very mild for a yancha, which is usually balls to the walls from the first sip.

For the aroma of the second steep, there are notes of sweet molasses and chocolate with wet limestone and a nice burst of wet coals at the finish. It is stronger than the first steep, but sadly has lost the walnut shell notes. The taste reminds me of strong dark chocolate, just a touch sweet and nicely bitter with a coal and mineral finish. Often when these rock teas have a strong coal and dark chocolate flavor it reminds me of the burnt edge of a s’more you let catch on fire. Tasty but burnt chocolate!

The third steep’s aroma is faint by comparison, just notes of wet leaves and wet coal with a ghost of molasses. The aroma made promises of faintness that the taste fulfilled, this tea has given up the ghost. All that is left is the ghost of burnt chocolate and mineral, like rainwater more than wet limestone. If you want a tea that lingers for a while I say look elsewhere, but if you want a nice char heavy DHP for a fairly cheap price then this one works and fulfills that craving if you are running low on the higher end stuff.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2016/04/tealyra-da-hong-pao-superfine-tea-review.html

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