Organic Nonpareil Heavily Roasted Tie Guan Yin “Iron Goddess” Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by TeaVivre
Average preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 2 min, 0 sec

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2 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I am a roasty kind of girl. So I was excited to receive a sample from Teavivre of the heavily roasted Iron Goddess. I also have the "regular" Iron Goddess, so I decided to compare the two. I...” Read full tasting note
    88
    Lala1 765 tasting notes
  • “This tea is described as 'heavily roasted' and I expected it to be akin to a 'dark' or 'moderate' roasted oolong, with notes of charcoal or a baked flavour. I steeped the pouch of tea provided at...” Read full tasting note
    arnoldzeman 2 tasting notes

From Teavivre

Origin: Zhangzhou(漳州) in Fujian, China

Ingredients: Hand made into small, rolled up leaves

Harvest time: Oct, 2012

Taste: Sweet and soft taste with coffee fragrance for first sip, long-last flavor, sweet aftertaste around throat

Brew: Use water at 212ºF (100ºC) and infuse the tea for 1-3 minutes

Health Benefits: Tie Guan Yin tea is the premium form of Chinese Oolong teas. Being lightly fermented, these teas are high amino acids, vitamins, polyphenols and antioxidants. These combine into a tea that reduces cholesterol and helps reduce hardening of the arteries, and so can help reduce risks of heart attacks. The antioxidants it contains can also help guard against some forms of cancer, and also help fight the affects of aging and bacterial infections.

About Teavivre View company

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2 Tasting Notes

88
765 tasting notes

I am a roasty kind of girl. So I was excited to receive a sample from Teavivre of the heavily roasted Iron Goddess. I also have the “regular” Iron Goddess, so I decided to compare the two. I have previously tried the regular version.

The dry tea of both varieties look very similar to each other. The heavily roasted is a bit darker green colour. They both smell very similar with the roasted being a slightly stronger smell.

After brewing, the regular version is a light greenish yellow colour, the roasted is more of a brown green colour. They both smell the same with the roasted being a stronger smell. Both very floral.

But that’s where the similarities end. While I find the regular version to be quite floral, light, slightly sweet grass type flavour. The roasted is a stronger, woody type flavour. Only slightly floral. Less sweet. Reminds me more of butter. There is definitely a roasty flavour, like roasted nuts.

Both varieties are good, but I think I would always go for the roasted version if available.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 2 min, 0 sec

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2 tasting notes

This tea is described as ‘heavily roasted’ and I expected it to be akin to a ‘dark’ or ‘moderate’ roasted oolong, with notes of charcoal or a baked flavour. I steeped the pouch of tea provided at 90ºC in a 150ml porcelain gaiwan for multiple infusions but wasn’t ever able to detect anything like that at all. Nor could I sense the coffee taste their website describes.
In my view, the tea I was sent is of high quality, light body, predominantly herbaceous flavours and floral scents. I say ‘sent’ simply because I now question whether I was sent the tea that I ordered or another Tie Guan Yin. Adding to my doubt is the picture on Steepster: the tea I received looked nothing like this; it was a green colour.
Having said this, the packaging of the tea in individual vacuum sealed pouches is outstanding.

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