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Pu-erh Tea
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  • “Of all aspects of this tea, the most stunning was the initial wet-leaf aroma. Goodness. A rich, intoxicating push of licorice root and star anise, following by a bundle of tropical fruit:...” Read full tasting note
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    the_skua 207 tasting notes

From The Essence of Tea

I think this is the most easily accessable of our 2010 puerh productions this year. The flavour is fresh and pure, composed of 100% old tree leaves from trees averaging around 400 years old growing around Manmai village in the Bada region of Xishuangbanna. The processing was excellent, with each stage done entirely by hand. The rolling was tight, which compromises the visual appearance of the leaves in the pressed cake, but produces much more endurance throughout the infusions.

The flavour is fresh and pure, with a nice bitterness (ku wei) leading to a long lasting sweet aftertaste in the mouth. An excellent introduction for newcomers to old tree puerh or a high quality cake for the seasoned collector.

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2 Tasting Notes

84
207 tasting notes

Of all aspects of this tea, the most stunning was the initial wet-leaf aroma. Goodness. A rich, intoxicating push of licorice root and star anise, following by a bundle of tropical fruit: persimmion, jack-fruit, rambutan, and banana. Absolutely illustrious. A lot of aroma came out of a small amount of dark, large, well-dressed leaves that were dark and had an excellent sheen.

Hot steeps and long ones produced surprisingly light tea. I kept my chubby yixing only partially filled in an attempt to concentrate the flavors, but for the first few steeps of treating this tea like other young sheng pu’er, I felt as though I could taste the minerals of the water and the clay more than anything from the tea. An ephemeral and ethereal gauze of apricot, straw, and honeydew made brief appearances. Otherwise, the water extracted light green bitterness, a not so subtle reminder that pu’er, in its early days, is really a form of green tea. Maybe I should have treated this sample as such.

Full blog post: http://tea.theskua.com/?p=239

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