Organic Qu Hao

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Jim Marks
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

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4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I am still anxiously awaiting a shipment from the exotic land of French Canada (Camellia Sinensis order including some things I've never heard of, let alone tried) and have been pounding the new...” Read full tasting note
    jimmarks 325 tasting notes

From The Path of Tea

Multiple tips with a delicate, elegantly twisted leaf. The aroma is exquisitely fresh and mild. Grown in cloudy, moist conditions, Qu Hao is a rare tea: the high quality leaves are picked only once a year, between the end of March and early April. The tea is hand dried by pressing it against the sides of a hot wok. This is one of China’s most highly regarded teas, and only available in limited quantities. It is from the Wuyi Mountains and is processed green all year. Once a year it is processed black.

About The Path of Tea View company

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4 Tasting Notes

325 tasting notes

I am still anxiously awaiting a shipment from the exotic land of French Canada (Camellia Sinensis order including some things I’ve never heard of, let alone tried) and have been pounding the new yixing with Upton’s Wang pu-erh pretty thoroughly, so I wanted to take a break, re-group, and clean house a bit.

So, I am brewing up the last of this in my pyrex and straining into the hand made glazed pot which I bought from the very nice octogenarian woman at the Japanese-American Cultural Festival of Houston two years ago.

I need to find out more about this tea so that I can investigate higher quality options, if they exist. This is a very fine tea, but because Path of Tea is serving a retail population they have to be much more careful to balance price point with quality than, say, Upton, CS, TeaG, or Verdant does. What I mean is that this tea is good enough that it makes me want to find the finest varient of it I can get my hands on.

A friend has said that the wet leaf smells like oatmeal. I get cacao, myself.

The cup has, as I think I’ve said before, the sweetness of Yunnan golden without the fruit.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec

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