Licorice Root

Tea type
Herbal Tea
Ingredients
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Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by TeaSnob
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 8 min or more

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  • “The initial taste is spiced and bitter. The spiced is new, but the bitter is exactly like the dried tea only not as strong. The thing to note here is that yes, some teas get bitter when they are...” Read full tasting note
    90
    TeaSnobbery 20 tasting notes

From The Tao of Tea

In Sanskrit, it is called ‘Malathi’ or ‘sweet stalk’. The Greeks named it ‘sweet root’ and the Chinese call it ‘gan cao’, which means ‘sweet grass’. This intense sweetness can be traced to glycyrrhizic acid, a multipurpose molecule that consists of two sugar moieties. The varied properties of the molecule have led to the surprising mix of products that contain licorice today: medicines, cough syrups, herbal supplements, gum, drinks and, of course, candy. Glycyrrhizic acid resides naturally in the root of the licorice plant. Licorice is a shrubby, woody-rooted plant with feathery leaves and light blue-violet flowers. It grows in the wild in many Middle Eastern, European, and Western Asian countries. The branching roots grow down as far as 3 feet and out laterally up to 20 feet. The root is harvested, dried, and sold to licorice processors. Licorice helps to heal ulcers and extends the life of prostaglandins that protect the stomach wall. The effect on prostaglandins may also explain why licorice helps soothe a cough. The aroma and flavor is sweet and comforting, reminiscent of anise or fennel, but considerably stronger. Caffeine free.

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1 Tasting Note

90
20 tasting notes

The initial taste is spiced and bitter. The spiced is new, but the bitter is exactly like the dried tea only not as strong. The thing to note here is that yes, some teas get bitter when they are steeped, but this was bitter before it was steeped so it is safe to assume that the bitter is not from being steeped, but rather from the tea itself. After a little bit it starts to taste a little like dandelion, but with a splash of spice. It has the same type of bitterness of a fresh dandelion, mixed with a similar sweet aftertaste. If you don’t know what that tastes like it is light and flowery, with a rich bitter undertone.

If you would like to full tasting notes go to: http://teasnobbery.com/2010/05/21/tea-review-tao-of-tea-licorice/

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 8 min or more

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