Yixing Gong Fu Hong Cha

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Certification
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Edit tea info Last updated by Thomas Smith
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 min or more

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  • “Such a yummy, easy-going tea. Incredibly forgiving to brew, this is terrific at low concentration for short steeps on up to high concentration with absurdly long ones. I just sat down and sipped...” Read full tasting note
    76
    ThomasSmith 93 tasting notes

From Tillerman Tea

The city of Yixing is known for the unique clay teapots used in formal Chinese ceremonies but little is known about the tea from this region. We are thrilled to share this black tea with you from Yixing. Robust spicy flavors harmonized by the smoky aromatics characterize this tea. Used to season the best zisha (purple sand) teapots from Yixing, this tea is also ideal for anyone learning the formal Chinese tea ceremony: Gongfu tea!

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1 Tasting Note

76
93 tasting notes

Such a yummy, easy-going tea. Incredibly forgiving to brew, this is terrific at low concentration for short steeps on up to high concentration with absurdly long ones. I just sat down and sipped this from a gaiwan while watching a movie, leaving this to brew for well beyond 15 minutes. Used 4g with an initial water volume of 125ml at 90 degrees Celsius and a quick rinse.

Dry fragrance is dried apricot and resinous hardwood in the bag, but when tossed in a prewarmed vessel, a heady fragrance of dried dates, figs, and kiwi skin mixed with the sort of lightly charred smokiness of a iron skillet. Wetted leaves release some musty, mossy aromas. Liquor aroma is sort of in-between a Keemun and Dian Hong. Tacky, somewhat sweet, woody. A touch of burning, wet thyme and rosemary and grilled pineapple.

Savory impression. At low concentrations or shortly after adding water when drinking from the brewing tea, it comes off as crisp, sweet, and light in most aspects. Cocoa-dusted toffee almonds with a lingering light basil note in the aftertaste. At higher concentrations, more resin is evident with notes of dates, dried apricot, sunflower seeds, black pepper, cinnamon, prune, cooked onions, poppyseed, clay, and barley atop a rich body. Aside from the light crispness and a somewhat tannin-like characteristic, this is very smooth. Hearty and belly-filling.

Easy to drink alongside food and can handle having junk mixed into it like milk and sweetener. Heck, it can even handle a bit of citrus (heaven forbid someone would purposefully add such a thing to good tea outside of experimentation) and hold a decent amount of flavor when brewed long and strong. I usually want to add this to any breakfast-style tea I try to blend for, but the lack of astringency and general mellow quality inevitably leaves this tea sapping the aggressive elements out of the teas it’s blended with.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 8 min or more

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