Imperial Oolong

Tea type
Oolong Tea
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Edit tea info Last updated by Aduial
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  • “TWG's Imperial (Formosa) Oolong doesn't taste like Chinese tea at all! More specifically, it doesn't taste like the Chinese tea I'm used to. This one has got a woody/musky taste with a hint of...” Read full tasting note
    aduial 7 tasting notes

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2 Tasting Notes

7 tasting notes

TWG’s Imperial (Formosa) Oolong doesn’t taste like Chinese tea at all! More specifically, it doesn’t taste like the Chinese tea I’m used to.

This one has got a woody/musky taste with a hint of lingering sweetness riding above it. It also carries with it the aroma of … well, Lipton/generic “Western” tea, for want of a better word, and it feels like it would go well with milk and sugar. In fact, I shall try it the next time.

It’s not that I didn’t like this tea; it’s just that I’ve got preconceived notions of what oolong should taste like, and it definitely isn’t like this, so I won’t rate it until I’ve gotten over my stereotype upheaval and can approach this tea from a more unbiased POV.

bainderose

Thanks for your comments! Note that TWG Tea’s Imperial Oolong is in fact from Formosa (Taiwan) and is therefore processed according to Formosa methods (i.e. up to 70% oxidation) which makes this oolong more akin to a black tea than a green tea. China oolongs are only oxidized up to 12%, which make them much lighter and fragrant, more akin to green teas.
Chances are, you’d love a Chinese method oolong, such as Kwai Flower Imperial. :-)

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