Leaf Tea (Loose Leaf)

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
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Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by LENA
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 min, 45 sec 45 oz / 1330 ml

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12 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I got this at the Middle Eastern market where I go to buy all my cheap teas. I just got it a month ago and the expiration label already says Feb 2012 so that was clearly my mistake. It is strange...” Read full tasting note
    66
    amyoh2 2469 tasting notes
  • “A treat---was able to pick up an experimental ounce bulk at my getting-better-all-the-time favorite little health food store. Looks just like PG tips--ground fine, but used in the same proportions,...” Read full tasting note
    gmathis 1737 tasting notes
  • “I ran across this several months ago, and having an interest in British teas (and the cheap price tag) I picked up a box. Just today I finally tried a cup. As soon as I opened the bag I had second...” Read full tasting note
    43
    laurenpressley 796 tasting notes
  • “A typical English breakfast blend, similar to PG Tips. It is a finely ground tea, fannings rather than leaf. The first taste is a brisk Ceylon, followed by the maltiness of the Assam. But the tea...” Read full tasting note
    51
    bburrowes 141 tasting notes

From Typhoo

Way back in 1903, John Sumner made a refreshing discovery. By specially selecting and blending teas of outstanding quality he unlocked the secret of Typhoo OOs…a deliciously smooth tasting cuppa.

Over 100 years later Typhoo’s team of experts are passionate about perfecting every stage of the tea leaf’s journey right from the tea bush to your tea cup helping you to brew your perfect cuppa every time.
So why not put the kettle on and let those OOs infuse.

About Typhoo View company

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12 Tasting Notes

66
2469 tasting notes

I got this at the Middle Eastern market where I go to buy all my cheap teas. I just got it a month ago and the expiration label already says Feb 2012 so that was clearly my mistake.

It is strange that the leaves in this loose leaf pack are ground up so fine, it’s like they just used the same tea that they would use for teabags. Is it necessary to be THAT cheap?

Anyway I digress. I steeped this for 4 minutes with boiling water and it is generically average, mundane is definitely the word that comes to mind (see my rating scale on the right). I wouldn’t choose to bring this with me on a desert island but if it was there I would most likely drink it. :)

I think it might be a Ceylon, there is a bit of briskness in the cup, a slight bitterness. I did run off to get some soymilk to throw in this, but oddly enough I liked it better plain. I don’t know if this is my tastebuds adapting or what.

I’ve been thinking about doing an art project with tea and this would be a likely culprit. Though I reckon the tannins in tea would eat away at paper and such over the years.

ScottTeaMan

What kind of art do you like to create??

TeaBrat

Different things, I’ve done a lot of watercolor paintings in the past and collage stuff. I really need to get my act together and post them on the internets somewhere!

K S

This happens at the market where I shop as well. Buyer beware because they take nothing off the shelf. That’s why I will never buy loose leaf out of the bins.

Bonnie

Use wood board! Or use canvas and gesso it first and let dry!

TeaBrat

hmm. I wonder if the tea would sufficiently permeate the gesso? I’ll have to try it one of these days!

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1737 tasting notes

A treat—-was able to pick up an experimental ounce bulk at my getting-better-all-the-time favorite little health food store. Looks just like PG tips—ground fine, but used in the same proportions, seems to be just a tetch lighter and brighter in flavor (not in appearance). Would have to do a side-by-side comparison to be sure, and tea geeky as I am, I’d love to do that, but time is going to be a tight commodity this week. (Sigh. Not a great thought for an early Monday morning.)

Michelle Butler Hallett

Oooh, Typhoo. Haven’t sipped that in years. Must keep my eye out for the loose version.

ashmanra

gmathis, I love you! You made my day by saying “tetch”. I haven’t heard that since my mom passed away. My oldest relatives used tetched, het, yonder, riled up, and such regularly! I know exactly how much is “a mess” of collards. Sigh. The Southern language is truly a child of Shakespeare, having descended nearly unchanged from Elizabethan English.

gmathis

Yep—a mess of spinach for salad, and it looks like it’s clabberin’ up to rain outside today. Just holler if you want to compare further Ozark/Southern Missouri vocabulary words… and if you haven’t read “Christy,” you need to, for the colloquialisms alone!

Michelle Butler Hallett

Souther US English bears some resemblance to Newfoundland English, which remained very much unchanged from the late 1600s to about mid-20th century. Back in university, I sounded out a phonetics-written speech from Shakespeare (Juliet, “What’s in a name?”)m the phonetics supposedly showing how Elizabethans pronounced the words. Know what I heard? A blend of Newfoundland and souther US accents.

I’m all for learning to read and write in Standard English, but the dialects are often much richer in vocab. Cuppa tay, now.

Michelle Butler Hallett

You might hear “tetch” here, too. More often pronoucned “titch.”

gmathis

In the book I’m going on and on about (set in Cutter Gap, Tennessee, circa 1912), one of the discoveries of the main character is the wealth of Scots-Irish heritage that’s been buried under years of neglect, including the ballads that hearken back to Bonnie Prince Charlie.

ashmanra

Since I was a musician and performer from age 7, many people thought I was British when I was growing up! I spoke like the people I listened to all the time – namely Rex Harrison and Christopher Plummer – my heroes! But I can do terrific impressions of several Southern accents and lapse into one when I speak to a real Southerner. The Southern Belle is the most fun. My elder sister actually speaks that way! She used to lean toward me when my parents best friends visited and whisper, “They don’t know better, they’re Yankees.”

Someone asked me once if we pronounced “aunt” as “awnt” or “ant.” The answer was….neither! If you are saying, “This is my aunt,” you pronounced it “ant.” But if you were calling your aunt by name, it was “aint!” I had an Aint Ethel, and Aint Inez, and Aint Neal….they would have died laughing if we had said “awnt” and would have accused us of putting on airs!

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43
796 tasting notes

I ran across this several months ago, and having an interest in British teas (and the cheap price tag) I picked up a box. Just today I finally tried a cup.

As soon as I opened the bag I had second thoughts. It looked worse that the tea in the teabags that I get at many of the local restaurants… the tea was tiny and granular. I wondered for a second if maybe it was instant. Rereading the box I realized it was not, but didn’t see how it would stay in a strainer. I got the finest mesh one in my possession and brewed up a cup to see how it would go.

It brewed very darkly! It looked more like coffee than tea. Typically, when learning about a cup of tea I start with it plain, then add things in to see if creamer or sweetener enhances the flavor. This one I just went straight to the doctoring up phase.

And you know what? It was actually pretty good. It’s not something I’d really look forward to having, but if it were rainy or cold out and I just wanted a basic cuppa, it would hit the spot! So I guess I’ve learned my lesson about preconceived notions…. this one will end up staying in my pantry until I finish it!

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 0 sec
LENA

LOL…I picked this up at a little British store too. I don’t think I’ve tried it yet. :)

ashmanra

Sounds a lot like one my middle daughter loves called London Cuppa. We only steep it for two and a half minutes, but it is a good basic tea. We ran out and can’t find it now, so now eldest in Ireland is trying to find some to send me. Maybe this would be a good replacement. I think I saw it at Southern Season, which is BTW having their clearance sale! All teas discounted!

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51
141 tasting notes

A typical English breakfast blend, similar to PG Tips. It is a finely ground tea, fannings rather than leaf. The first taste is a brisk Ceylon, followed by the maltiness of the Assam. But the tea is rather harsh and somewhat bitter aftertaste, even with honey and two packets of splenda, as well as half and half, to tame it. Oh well, at least it is not bland and tasteless like Lipton or Tetley. When I visited friends in England fifteen years ago, I thought this tea tasted great, so much better than American tea.

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 30 sec

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50
115 tasting notes

When I bought this tea, I wondered why the box was labeled “Leaf Tea” rather than “Loose Leaf Tea”. I soon found out when I opened the foil bag inside keeping the “leaves” fresh.

Leaf Quality:
I opened the bag, and what I found was unexpected. The tea was very finely cut/ground, more so than CTC. Some pieces were larger than others, but the tea could be compared to grains of salt. Some pieces were very dark while others were a lighter brown. They smelled better than it looked; almost like a crisp orange pekoe or English breakfast. However, this tea would have gone better in bags, as it is pretty difficult to filter tea so finely ground.

Brewed Tea:
The tea dust produced a dark brown cuppa, with a slight reddish hue. It smelled malty, and a bit chocolaty. There wasn’t much character in the tea. Perhaps there was some Assam in this. It was crisp, just as it smelled, and I had brewed it a bit strong (I have a feeling this tea can withhold longer steepings).

I decided to add a lemon slice, and a tiny squeeze of lemon juice. This lightened the color a bit, and made the tea more pleasant. As I mentioned before, this tea lacks the character that other teas possess. There wasn’t anything in particular that stood out to me. However, I’m sure this will make a nice iced tea.

This is not my favorite tea, but it was nice to drink something to soothe to my sore throat and my terrible cough.

Preparation
Boiling 3 min, 45 sec

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80
50 tasting notes

This tea instantly transports me to my days at Oxford, senior summer of high school. I am by no means an old fogey, but I am a sentimental human who misses England terribly!

It is basic, strong, black tea, ground finer than most loose leaf. I like it strong, with whole milk, no sugar. Not much to say flavor-wise, but I have a soft spot for it. What can I say?

Preparation
4 min, 0 sec

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68
8 tasting notes

Paul McCartney mentions that he and John Lennon would try to smoke this in his dads pipe. Hmm? I like the loose leaf Typhoo good with milk or without, very powdery and dark, but compared to cheap American tea it is way more flavorful. It tastes like black tea should. The Typhoo tea bags I have found to be way less consistent in quality.

Preparation
Boiling 5 min, 0 sec

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53
14 tasting notes

Attempt #1 at making Snapple: Tried this iced with Lemon Green from English Tea Store and a bunch of sugar. Not bad, but a kind of weird aftertaste.

Preparation
190 °F / 87 °C 4 min, 0 sec

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67
7 tasting notes

this tea delivers a smooth cup with almost no aftertaste and the caffeine content seems higher than average too. however, i am honestly not sure how to describe the flavor of this one. it surely has a flavor because even with extra sugar, the tea flavor remains unaltered and the sweet flavor i want never shows up. perhaps the word for the flavor is whatever the opposite of malty is, unsure, but it is definitely not weak. i made 3 full pots and 2 more cups of varying strength and steeping time. i simply could not find a combination i would want to drink everyday. i also sent it to my girlfriends house who lives with 2 other tea drinkers and the only person who drank it more than once in that house was me and it was only because she kept making it for me since she thought i wanted her to do so…

further, this blend is made without any teas from africa and i am wondering if that may be what is missing for me in the flavor. (i ended up combining the remaining 5+ tbsp with an equal portion of taylors of harrogate pure assam and then added a small amount of scottish breakfast as well.)

Preparation
Boiling 4 min, 30 sec 4 tsp 45 OZ / 1330 ML

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43
10 tasting notes

It’s tiny crumbs of tea. The smallest ones fall through my filter. As you’d expect, the water darkens really fast, and the taste isn’t great. It might be OK in bags for everyday use but it’s too frustrating in this form.

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