Finest Earl Grey (TE20)

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Auggy
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 15 sec

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28 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Honestly, just not feeling this one. The bergamot flavoring is really faint - it came through most in the aftertaste as kind of a light citrus-y, whoosh-y, almost flowery feel in my mouth after...” Read full tasting note
    60
    aug3zimm 911 tasting notes
  • “*Knock* *Knock* “Yes, may I help you?” “I am here to see the Earl of Grey” “He doesn’t live here, try another tea” While a pleasant tea, my unsophisticated palate does not pick up the Earl...” Read full tasting note
    70
    Hawkeye 100 tasting notes
  • “Dry leaves have a strong flavor but somehow it does not translate into the steeped tea in any meaningful way. Rather bland for my tastebuds - and this is coming from a Ceylon fan.” Read full tasting note
    61
    erteke 21 tasting notes

From Upton Tea Imports

Description: Similar to our Original Earl Grey, but with Ceylon black tea as the base tea. The bergamot scenting is light enough for the quality of the base tea to be noticed.
Ingredients: black tea, natural & artificial flavor
Origin: Germany

About Upton Tea Imports View company

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28 Tasting Notes

60
911 tasting notes

Honestly, just not feeling this one. The bergamot flavoring is really faint – it came through most in the aftertaste as kind of a light citrus-y, whoosh-y, almost flowery feel in my mouth after the sip. The description says that the bergamot is “light enough for the quality of the base tea to be noticed” but I wasn’t really feeling the tea base all that much. I mean, it had a nice mouthfeel to it – it was kind of thick and furry and made me think of the texture of cocoa powder – but the taste of the tea? Not all that impressive. Maybe this is my anti-Ceylon showing through but I just found the tea kind of dull and unexciting – not really flat or cardboard-y like bad tea, but not a whole lot of depth or any pretty notes. I did add a little sugar and milk to this so that might have killed off any faint pretty notes the tea might have had. We’ll see if I change my tune when I try this straight.

I would speculate that Ceylon fans would enjoy this one since it does have a noticeable tea base. Though I can’t say for sure how good of a Ceylon it is, I’d have to guess it’d be at least on the good side of decent for Upton to want to showcase it. But for me? Just doesn’t hit any of my happy buttons.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 0 sec
Thomas Smith

I’m starting to feel a little competition growing in me reading all your EG posts, hahaha. I finally found a distributor of bergamot oranges in my state (for this season, anyway) and I’m thinking it’s about time to start working on the newest batches of Green Raven Tea & Coffee Earl Greys…
Sounds like you prefer the perfume-like bergamot oil extract verses the true bergamot orange peel oil citrus and floral aroma?
I might have to toss a couple samples your way come late winter.

Auggy

Well if competition growing in you leads to you tossing me samples, bring on the competition! :)
And honestly, I can’t really say if I prefer the perfume-like oil extract vs. the true bergamot orange peel because I am not sure enough of the difference (perhaps from having most things with the oil extract?). I will say that I remember liking A&D’s Earl Grey and Rishi’s Earl Grey because they struck me as having kind of juicy bergamot and I am not all that fond of Taylor’s of Harrogate’s EG because it struck me as too perfume-y… but I have no idea if that would be bergamot-flavoring-related or something else. What’s a good way to tell?

Thomas Smith

Well, the overly perfume-like quality can either be from using too much oil extract or using a false bergamot oil. Most companies apply the scenting agent directly on the leaves, producing a heady fragrance and persistent aroma. Direct scenting with the real oil (extract or pressed peels) lends a light bitter taste, which is sort of the only way to tell flavor-wise if it’s actually from bergamot oranges versus a mimic or synthetic scenting agent… You could try rubbing the leaves on your arm and go out and get a sunburn if you really care – a chemical in unrefined oil from the citrus will cause slight discoloration and increased light sensitivity (really, if you can’t taste the difference, who cares?). Indirect scenting with either extract or pressed peels produces a citrus and floral accent more true to the aroma of the oranges, but is much more labor intensive, time consuming, and expensive. I much prefer the results of indirect scenting with the extract or I directly apply spritzed oil from the actual peels and blend non-crushed dried peel with the leaves, though this can take over a week for 500g and cost ridiculous amounts of money without a commercial setup and supplier.

Auggy

Interesting – just like the different ways of scenting/flavoring jasmine teas, yes? Very interesting! Know any commercially available EGs that are indirectly scented? I’m guessing the EGs I’ve had that make me think juicy, fruity thoughts would fall into that category?

Thomas Smith

Well, the vast majority of Jasmines are still scented with the flowers or petals mixed with the tea and removed, with the big difference between them being the quality of tea, freshness of tea & jasmine, number of scenting rounds, and shape of leaves during scenting.

I can only speak of the differences in scenting EG from my screwball home experiments – sorry. I can definitely tell you that the indirectly scented ones made of intact leaves lose most of the aroma in subsequent infusions since the scenting is mostly an aromatic taint to the outsides of the leaves.

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70
100 tasting notes

Knock Knock
“Yes, may I help you?”
“I am here to see the Earl of Grey”
“He doesn’t live here, try another tea”

While a pleasant tea, my unsophisticated palate does not pick up the Earl Grey flavorings in this tea. It is not bad and reminds me of another “pure” unflavored tea I have had – Assam or Ceylon maybe? Did I mention the unsophisticated palate? This is pretty good but it doesn’t fit EG the bill for me. I have learned to appreciate subtle flavorings in Japanese food but apparently not for this tea.

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61
21 tasting notes

Dry leaves have a strong flavor but somehow it does not translate into the steeped tea in any meaningful way. Rather bland for my tastebuds – and this is coming from a Ceylon fan.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 5 min, 0 sec

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