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Haixintang 2006 Wild Arbor Shu

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
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Caffeine
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Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Starfevre
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 45 sec

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10 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I finally got a chance to relax & run through several gongfu steepings of this one today. The predominant element was a clean earthiness & a minty fresh sensation. Edit: AND the flavor of...” Read full tasting note
    Terri HarpLady 2498 tasting notes
  • “Sipdown, 131. I was originally going to have a different type of tea for the afternoon, but then I decided it would be interesting to see if I could taste differences in shu puerhs. So I grabbed...” Read full tasting note
    dinosara 1851 tasting notes
  • “Okay, so I'm drinking the first cup of this (brewed Western style because that's how I roll) cold because I'm intimidated by it and I've been staring at it for the last 7 hours now without taking a...” Read full tasting note
    Starfevre 501 tasting notes
  • “Tried this in a banko-yakipot with Kunzan tetsubin. 5g / 200ml 2xwash/15/30/45 Still do not like it. The ripe fruit just isn´t there. Earthy, perhaps a bit of sweet herb? A tiny bit...” Read full tasting note
    65
    Dagwed 216 tasting notes

From Verdant Tea (Special)

Verdant Reserve Club – May

To present only one tea from Haixintang does not do justice to their venerable workshop. Our hope is that by presenting two very different teas from the same year and workshop, you will be able to see how processing technique alters the flavors of the leaf while similarities are there to be discovered.

The 2006 shu is packed with that delicious cooling camphor aroma and notes of pine forest. The body is surprisingly thick and full of refined caramel notes, while moving towards juicier more refreshing textures in later steepings. Fresh sweet mint flavor engages the palate while being beautiful balanced by darker notes. Many of the intense elements of the sheng are present, but counterbalanced, making this a great side-by-side comparison tasting.

About Verdant Tea (Special) View company

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10 Tasting Notes

2498 tasting notes

I finally got a chance to relax & run through several gongfu steepings of this one today. The predominant element was a clean earthiness & a minty fresh sensation.

Edit: AND the flavor of Hominy (grits). That came up in later steepings.

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1851 tasting notes

Sipdown, 131. I was originally going to have a different type of tea for the afternoon, but then I decided it would be interesting to see if I could taste differences in shu puerhs. So I grabbed this one!

The initial impression is that this one is very similar to the Xingyang shu, but it reveals its differences. The predominant note is wood, but this is like pine rather than oak. This lacks the deeper aged bourbon notes, instead this is brighter and crisper. No candy sweetness either, a cleaner, sharper texture. As the steeps progress it got less woody. The grits/cornmeal/tamale crust that Terri mentions is spot on. Interesting. A hint of sweetness pops up.

I do enjoy trying out all these puerhs. Education! :D

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501 tasting notes

Okay, so I’m drinking the first cup of this (brewed Western style because that’s how I roll) cold because I’m intimidated by it and I’ve been staring at it for the last 7 hours now without taking a sip. I have to drink 750 ml of it in the next 2 hours though or I’ll have to pour some out before I go home. I don’t like leaving liquids in the pot overnight.

An hour later, I forget myself and start drinking while talking and I made the most horrible face and had to interrupt myself, coughing. I do not like this tea at all. I liked the sheng version of this cake, but the shu version does not agree with me in the slightest. The ‘earthiness’ (the best word I can find, though it’s not exactly what I’m looking for) is just not to my taste at all. Still on the search for a shu that I can drink.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 30 sec
Stephanie

Heh, puerhs are funny things aren’t they? Sorry you didn’t like it!

Starfevre

Nothing to be sorry about, just part of the horizon-expanding experience.

Terri HarpLady

I have this all measured out, getting ready to try the first steeping :)

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65
216 tasting notes

Tried this in a banko-yakipot with Kunzan tetsubin.

5g / 200ml
2xwash/15/30/45

Still do not like it. The ripe fruit just isn´t there. Earthy, perhaps a bit of sweet herb? A tiny bit mint?
Think ill dump the rest of the sample in the bin. waste of time when theres so many teas out there thats better.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec
Bonnie

I’ve found that most success is acheived using a gaiwan and the taste really begins to show about the 5th steep onward (sometimes the third). Short steeps adding a few seconds with each round. I only use a pot and long steep when I want to make a puerh latte by adding milk and sugar. (This is particularly good with a shu that’s not overly cedar wood tasting)

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95
92 tasting notes

A Shu with extremely thick and rich earthy taste. Brewing in gaiwan as per instructions and so far I absolutely love it.

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100
35 tasting notes

Hello and welcome to a belated taste note on the Verdant Tea (special) Wild Arbor Shu!!! .
Thanks to David Duckler of Verdant Tea for the exquisite Tea tasting experience! So it is my understanding that Shu and Sheng, but more often shu is served with Dim Sum when you request tea whilst there having lunch. My first impression of Tea at Dim-sum is that tea is extent in the meal as having it not really be the star of the meal, but as a complement. That impression has changed somewhat after sampling the Haixintang Shu.
Initially, the smell of mossy ground in the forest pervades the nose. I’m certain of one thing, it’s going into the cup for many steeps ( No rules apply here, among this despareate crowd, once you go in you are never coming out,…sorry I had a Star-One flashback) And the first steep is mild yet I can sense a thickness already. Quite refreshing in the throat, maybe it has a different flavor later on.
Further, it takes on clear fresh mint flavor by steeping three. I’m quite fond of mint leaf tisane and somehow it’s managed to get into my shu. I’ll be unsurprised if this doesn’t go for round seven and eight. Like eating at Dim Sum, I just keep refilling my teapot.
It would taste so decadent with some chicken shu mai, or a little fried potato and bacon cake. I know, how come my tasting notes always makes me hungry? Don’ worry it’s causing the same sensation for me.
Further still, The total steep I went up was the last one with a pretty conservative long steep(4min) so It’s got many of the initial tastes now, rather I have acquired the sum of all the flavors in the final cup and even much more of the camphor trace. I normally don’t get chem-traces from tea, but this one is unique! How like a sheng, or then again a trip to the international district might be in order. Looks like the comparison to sheng is that this one has a darker liquor and highlights of mint. I really can’t stress the mintiness on the later steeps enough, don’t forget to take this one all the way to 8 or more.

Preparation
Boiling 1 min, 30 sec

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934 tasting notes

I’ve never seen a tea that was naturally blood orange before. The flavor is so rich! It’s almost like a wine. The tea lasted for over 10 steepings.

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