Tian Di Ren Yiwu 2008 Shu Pu-er

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Berry, Bitter, Burnt, Camphor, Citrus, Earth, Floral, Licorice, Medicinal, Nutty, Pepper, Smoke, Spicy, Sweet, Wood
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Terri HarpLady
Average preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 119 oz / 3529 ml

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “I'm a sucker for Verdant teas, without a doubt. I'll buy almost everything they offer, & experience has shown me that I am rarely disappointed. I am very happy that I bought a cake of this. I'm...” Read full tasting note
    Terri HarpLady 3007 tasting notes
  • “I went into Verdant during my visit to Minneapolis and picked out a couple of things, and then asked for a couple of recommendations from the staff, for something unique and/or exceptionally good....” Read full tasting note
    75
    Anlina 296 tasting notes
  • “This is now the second "brick" (this one is actually a very shallow tuocha) of shou I've bought from Verdant. I previously had a brick of the Lao Tong Zhi Old Comrades 2011. I have to say, at this...” Read full tasting note
    jimmarks 325 tasting notes

From Verdant Tea

This well-balanced shu pu’er takes the bold camphor notes of Yiwu Mountain, and tempers them with the dark, smooth fruity qualities that Tian Di Ren works to bring out through their blending, pressing and aging techniques. The aroma of the wet leaf is heavy and satisfying with herbaceous sage and oregano undertones and notes of oak sherry cask.

The first steepings are very true to Yiwu Moutain: dark frankincense notes, and the aftertaste of camphor and sandalwood with a tingling and cooling sensation on the tongue. Later steepings reveal the style of Tian Di Ren with elderberry and tawny port in the forward flavor, and lingering cacao in the aftertaste. This builds towards an intriguing citrus flavor like candied blood orange bolstered by a satisfying thick vanilla body, while maintaining its clean, light mouthfeel.

Late steepings bring out sweet sesame candy, goji berries, and ripe blueberry. The sherry aroma expresses itself with a sherry-like flavor that lingers on the palate. The textures and aftertaste of this shu pu’er make it a promising tea to age in cakes. In our experience, the camphor and sandalwood aspects of Yiwu shu pu’er continue to grow over time, and the sweet vanilla and berry notes grow thicker and more all-encompassing.

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3 Tasting Notes

3007 tasting notes

I’m a sucker for Verdant teas, without a doubt. I’ll buy almost everything they offer, & experience has shown me that I am rarely disappointed.

I am very happy that I bought a cake of this. I’m really just getting started with it, maybe 5 steeps in, but really enjoying it’s complexity, starting with a blend of wood & incense in the early steepings, with a nice camphor mouth.

These middle steepings have an emerging fruitiness…
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Sadly, I got sidetrack & that is the extent of my notes, although I did continue to sip for a long time. I will probably up the amount to 7G I think next time, as I tend to like my Shu a little strong. All in all, I enjoyed it!

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75
296 tasting notes

I went into Verdant during my visit to Minneapolis and picked out a couple of things, and then asked for a couple of recommendations from the staff, for something unique and/or exceptionally good. This was one of theirs, and the person I talked to said it was a favourite of all the staff. I don’t have a lot of experience with pu’erhs so I’m excited to be trying this.

The dry leaf has a faint earthy and medicinal smell to it.

I put a few good chunks into my gaiwan and gave it two quick rinses with boiling water. After the second rinse the leaves were just starting to separate ever so slightly. Wet, the leaf smells earthy with a slightly burnt wood note.

My first steep, 5 seconds with just below boiling water. The liquor is bright and clear, a pale amber colour. On the nose, its the same as the wet leaf only fainter. The first cup is very mild tasting, not too much too it. Faint notes of earth, wood and camphor. A slightly pasty mouthfeel.

After a slight break to gobble down a mooncake, to make sure the rest of this sits well in my stomach, on to steep two, five seconds. The leaves are still partially caked together, but this time the liquor is much darker.

Stronger flavour, lots of wood and earth. The camphor has faded out a bit, though I’m getting a slight numbing mouth feel already, and a slight tickle in the back of my throat. Not a lot of nuances yet. I think I will steep a bit longer for my third steep.

Third steep, 10 seconds. The leaf is starting to come apart a bit more, and there’s a new fragrance that’s spicy in my nostrils, maybe more camphor and a touch of juniper. Lots of earth still there.

The liquor is a deep, reddish brown now. On the tongue, still mostly wood and earth, a touch of camphor and numbing, hints of wood smoke (nothing pungent like pine or cedar, maybe maple or poplar). and an interesting, almost sticky mouth feel under the tongue, but fairly silky everywhere else. Long after the sip is done, there’s a pepper and sandalwood note that comes out, and a warming sensation on the back of the tongue. There’s also some berry impressions that I can’t quite pinpoint. This is definitely developing nicely as the leaves open up more.

Fourth steep, 15 seconds. Even now the leaves are still clumped together a fair bit. The liquor is progressively darker, though this steep doesn’t have much fragrance.

Again, that sticky under the tongue mouth feel. Earth, a hint of bitterness, and a nice licorice flavour that quickly fades out to a sweetness on the back of the tongue. More camphor and numbing, and then a surprise burst of citrus on the finish, for just a moment.

Fifth steep, 15 seconds. Woody, earthy, slightly sweet, slightly medicinal. A little bit of smoke and nuttiness on the finish, and an almost slippery, coating mouth feel. A bit of licorice develops at the tail end of the finish.

Sixth steep, 20 seconds. Camphor, earth, a hint of bitterness. Numbing, a bit astringent on the finish. The sweetness and licorice is gone.

Seventh steep, 20 seconds. A bit bitter, smokey, earthy. A touch of sweetness is back, just fleeting mid tongue. The mouth feel is getting pasty again. There’s a sweet, floral note on a very long finish, and the licorice is back a bit.

This is interesting and I like it, but I don’t love it. I think there’s lots of steep left in these leaves. Only by steep seven had the leaves unclumped, so I’m going to set them aside for now and do some more steeps another time, but for now, I’m done.

Flavors: Berry, Bitter, Burnt, Camphor, Citrus, Earth, Floral, Licorice, Medicinal, Nutty, Pepper, Smoke, Spicy, Sweet, Wood

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 3 OZ / 88 ML
Amy Herbal Mama

Great note! I felt like I could taste the tea with you!

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325 tasting notes

This is now the second “brick” (this one is actually a very shallow tuocha) of shou I’ve bought from Verdant. I previously had a brick of the Lao Tong Zhi Old Comrades 2011. I have to say, at this point, I don’t anticipate all too frequently either (a) drinking sheng pu’erh or (b) buying shou in anything smaller than a complete bricktuocha.

Breaking up the tea myself gives me a lot more control over ongoing aging as well as breakage and it also means that early steeps are a lot more subtle because I’m hydrating a “slice” of leaves rather than completely loose leaves.

This 2008 already has some deeply musty notes while still retaining some of the sweetness of a young shou. There’s a definitely dominant presence of “flood damage” here. The whole room I’m sitting in has become overwhelmed with the scent.

While the chi impact compared to a sheng is far more subtle, it is still definitely active and I find the flavors so much more pleasing than sheng, I can’t imagine choosing the latter just for a stronger chi movement.

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 12 tsp 350 OZ / 10350 ML
Terri HarpLady

I was glad to grab a cake of this one while it was still available. I like both sheng & shu, really depending on my mood. Sheng definitely has a clarifying effect on me, which I sometimes can really benefit from, but I do also love the rich flavors of shu.

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