Shuixian Wuyi Yancha Zhuli

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
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Caffeine
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Edit tea info Last updated by Scharp
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1 Tasting Note View all

  • “Thank you *Vicony Teas* for the free sample! *Leaf Quality:* The leaves were long, dark green, and smelled toasty; there were a bit of stems in the mix as well, though not too much. The scent...” Read full tasting note
    70
    Scharp 115 tasting notes

From Vicony Teas

The Zhuli Shuixian Yancha hails from Zhuli, a small village in the Wuyi Mountain in China’s Fujian province. Zhuli village surrounded by the high mountains, at an average altitude above 600 meters, is a great place to produce Yancha. Although traditionally Zhuli Shuixian isn’t being considered as Zhengyan Yancha, while some top Zhuli Shuixian can even compete with Zhengyan Yancha Shuixian in taste and flavor. The exquisite Zhuli Shuixian was made of the top three to four leaves on the branch by an experienced tea manufacturer. After wilting and bruising the leaves, they are hand-rolled into their final shape. When brewed, these dark green-brown tea leaves create an amber infusion with an exquisite floral fragrance that complements the tea’s sweetness. The taste is smooth and lightly sweet, with a subtle dryness reminding of pear skin, followed by a lightly baked aftertaste. The Zhuli Shuixian Oolong can be infused up to six times, with each infusion revealing a new nuance of this tea’s complex flavor.

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1 Tasting Note

70
115 tasting notes

Thank you Vicony Teas for the free sample!

Leaf Quality:
The leaves were long, dark green, and smelled toasty; there were a bit of stems in the mix as well, though not too much. The scent was more of a black tea than an Oolong. The brewed leaves smelled chocolaty, and a bit acidic. I noticed a minute floral quality to the leaves in my last sniff.

Brewed Tea:
I got an immediate scent of buttery coconut from the 20 second steeping. The color was amber, and looked very nice. The flavor was very toasty as well, and had some muscatel notes with a bit of sweetness.
Second Steeping
The second cup was more floral than the first, but was still very toasty, and something new showed up: earthiness. This cup was a bit earthy. However, the coconut also decided to show in this brew.

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