China Fujian Tong Mu Wild Lapsang Souchong Black Tea

Tea type
Black Tea
Ingredients
Lapsang Souchong
Flavors
Almond, Bread, Chocolate, Citrus, Cookie, Cream, Floral, Lemon, Lemon Zest, Lychee, Malt, Mineral, Orange, Orange Blossom, Orchid, Peach, Pine, Pineapple, Rose, Soy Sauce, Straw, Sweet Potatoes, Tannin, Vegetal, Violet, Wood, Zucchini, Cinnamon, Marshmallow, Mushrooms, Pepper, Spicy, Vegetables, Brown Sugar, Butter, Honey, Peanut, Amaretto, Cherry, Dark Chocolate, Scotch, Smooth, Vanilla
Sold in
Loose Leaf
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Daylon R Thomas
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 6 g 4 oz / 113 ml

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

10 Want it Want it

2 Own it Own it

9 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Thanks to Daylon for sending me a sample of this tea, which I’ve wanted to try for a while. It’s usually out of stock, and I now understand why. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot at 195F for...” Read full tasting note
    96
  • “I’ve been drinking this April 2017 harvest western style in the mornings over the course of this week. Very clean, cooked vegetable savory and lemony and packed a heck of a caffeine punch. I...” Read full tasting note
    96
  • “This was my first sipdown of the month as I finished a mini-sample of this tea on the very first day of the month. I received the sample as a freebie with a more recent What-Cha order. As those of...” Read full tasting note
    93
  • “I’m working slower on this one than normal, and haven’t opened it up since last winter. Today was a tumbler fuel day, and it helped me drive through this creeping, gray ice we’re getting in...” Read full tasting note
    95

From What-Cha

A smooth tea with a sweet lingering citrus taste with notes of orange and lemon.

This is the non-smoky Lapsang Souchong.

Tasting Notes:
- Smooth texture
- Sweet lingering citrus taste
- Notes of orange and lemon

Harvest: Spring, May 10th 2016

Origin: Tong Mu Guan, Wuyishan, Fujian, China
Elevation: 1,340m
Sourced: Direct from the farmer

Brewing Advice:
- Heat water to roughly 95°C/203°F
- Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup/small teapot
- Brew for 2-3 minutes

Packaging: Resealable ziplock bag

About What-Cha View company

Company description not available.

9 Tasting Notes

96
314 tasting notes

Thanks to Daylon for sending me a sample of this tea, which I’ve wanted to try for a while. It’s usually out of stock, and I now understand why. I steeped 6 g of leaf in a 120 ml teapot at 195F for 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 90, 120, and 240 seconds, plus another few long infusions.

The dry aroma of this tea is an intoxicating blend of peach, lychee, pineapple, lemon, roasted almond, malt, violets, and other flowers. My nose was glued to these leaves for an inordinate amount of time. The first steep presents lemon first, and then reveals malt, roasted almonds, sweet potato, violet, zucchini, orange, pineapple, straw, and soy sauce. Lemon zest is noticeable in the next steep, as are notes of chocolate, baked bread, rose, cream, peach, and pineapple. Orange comes out in steeps three and four, along with all the other complex notes this oolong has to offer. I also notice malt and wood more in these steeps, along with orchid and orange blossom, though at this point my brain is overwhelmed and is probably just throwing out flavours at random. The next couple steeps are more malty and vegetal, with the same amount of citrus but less pineapple and stonefruit. I’m beginning to detect some minerality, and there’s a noticeable soy sauce aftertaste. By the one-minute mark, all the fruit except the citrus has disappeared and the tea leans on its malty, bready, vegetal, floral, and sweet potato profile, with whispers of tannins but no real astringency. The final steeps give me citrus, malt, pine, wood, minerals, roasted almonds, and tannins.

My whole review of this tea could have been “Wow!” This is what other black teas want to be when they grow up. As Daylon has mentioned, it’s very similar to the Lapsang from TheTea.pl, though I think the range of fruits is even wider. (This would be a perfect opportunity to break out my newly acquired 2021 Lapsang from TheTea for comparison!) This tea has excellent longevity and lovely, complex, comforting aromas and flavours, especially in the first few steeps. Thanks again to Daylon for giving up some of this tea for me to try.

Flavors: Almond, Bread, Chocolate, Citrus, Cookie, Cream, Floral, Lemon, Lemon Zest, Lychee, Malt, Mineral, Orange, Orange Blossom, Orchid, Peach, Pine, Pineapple, Rose, Soy Sauce, Straw, Sweet Potatoes, Tannin, Vegetal, Violet, Wood, Zucchini

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 6 g 4 OZ / 120 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

96
1237 tasting notes

I’ve been drinking this April 2017 harvest western style in the mornings over the course of this week. Very clean, cooked vegetable savory and lemony and packed a heck of a caffeine punch. I usually used 2 tsp for one steep of a minute or two at 205F, then a second steep for as long as it took me to get ready. Not once did I experience any bitterness or astringency preparing the tea this way.

Today, I finally got around to doing a gongfu session and regret not doing so sooner. The dry leaf, now with 2 years of age, has settled into a soy-sauced and lemony vegetable stir-fry with some pepperiness, sweet potato and marshmallow sweetness, rose and spicy wood (agar). In addition to those aromas, warming the leaf brought out some sautéed mushroom. The rinse, which I drank, was piercing and strong and I was able to discern something like ginkgo nuts. I don’t know how to describe that scent.

The taste was incredibly complex, showcasing the various aromas of the leaf with hints of almond, malt and cinnamon. The body was medium, satisfying, full in the throat. Clean minerality. Aftertastes of peach, peach pit, lemon, lychee and cream. Bottom of the cup aroma of toasted marshmallow? Orange-lemon aroma. The tea forcefully maintained these characteristics for 6 steeps, when most black teas would have lost much, if not all, of their steam. With the seventh steep, some orchid came out in the mouth and the tea transitioned into a stronger lemon taste. This tea just did not want to stop. At the end, I was pushing 10+ minute brews and still sipping on something bright with a light tannic bite. I’m amazed that a black tea could produce more than 15 steeps (the only other I’ve had with comparable longevity was the Jin Guazi offered by Old Ways Tea, another Wuyi black).

I wouldn’t say I’ve been wasting the tea with western style brewing, but the strength of the leaf and its flavor complexity blew me away when prepared gongfu. I recall the price being rather high, maybe somewhere less than $0.50/g, but in my opinion, this tea was well worth it and I would gladly buy more if it were restocked.

Flavors: Almond, Cinnamon, Cream, Lemon, Lychee, Malt, Marshmallow, Mineral, Mushrooms, Orange, Orchid, Peach, Pepper, Rose, Soy Sauce, Spicy, Sweet Potatoes, Vegetables, Wood

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

93
1031 tasting notes

This was my first sipdown of the month as I finished a mini-sample of this tea on the very first day of the month. I received the sample as a freebie with a more recent What-Cha order. As those of you who read my reviews are well aware, I am a huge, huge fan of Wuyi black teas. If I have one complaint about this specific style of tea (lapsang souchong/Zheng Shan Xiao Zhong), however, it is that teas of this type can often get a bit astringent. I did not have that complaint with this particular tea.

I prepared this tea gongfu style. After a quick rinse, I steeped 6 grams of loose tea leaves in 4 ounces of 203 F water for 5 seconds. This infusion was chased by 15 additional infusions. Steep times for these infusions were as follows: 7 seconds, 9 seconds, 12 seconds, 16 seconds, 20 seconds, 25 seconds, 30 seconds, 40 seconds, 50 seconds, 1 minute, 1 minute 15 seconds, 1 minute 30 seconds, 2 minutes, 3 minutes, and 5 minutes.

Prior to the rinse, the dry tea leaves emitted aromas of honey, cinnamon, roasted almond, mandarin orange, and peach. After the rinse, I found hints of baked bread, roasted peanut, and straw on the nose. The first infusion introduced floral scents reminiscent of rose and violet. In the mouth, the tea liquor presented notes of mandarin orange, baked bread, honey, roasted almond, and roasted peanut that were underscored by hints of straw. The subsequent infusions saw aromas of cream, lemon, malt, chocolate, brown sugar, and sweet potato emerge. Impressions of rose and violet appeared in the mouth along with subtle hints of cinnamon and peach. New notes of minerals, chocolate, brown sugar, cream, butter, malt, sweet potato, pine, and lemon also emerged. The final few infusions offered lingering mineral, malt, cream, and roasted almond notes that were balanced by hints of lemon, mandarin orange, sweet potato, and brown sugar.

This was an excellent Wuyi black tea, one that should satisfy even the most demanding fans of such teas. As mentioned earlier, I especially appreciated the fact that this tea never turned astringent. If you are looking for a quality unsmoked Wuyi black tea, be sure to check out this one.

Flavors: Almond, Bread, Brown Sugar, Butter, Chocolate, Cinnamon, Cream, Honey, Lemon, Malt, Mineral, Orange, Peach, Peanut, Pine, Rose, Straw, Sweet Potatoes, Violet

Preparation
6 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

95
1478 tasting notes

I’m working slower on this one than normal, and haven’t opened it up since last winter. Today was a tumbler fuel day, and it helped me drive through this creeping, gray ice we’re getting in Michigan right now. There’s something about this tea’s flavor that does better in the winter. It’s too bold for summer or fall, but it’s odd, silent intensity of citrus, vanilla, malt, and florals suits itself to the severe cold. Amaretto is a note this time in it’s viscous texture-there’s something about this tea that make me want to pour it over the rocks like a pure, sweet liquor. Eastteaguy and derk already wrote almond, and that’s the association I’m getting tonight.

I’m also a little on edge after listening to the prologue of a Wheel of Time: Eye of the World in Rosamund Pike’s voice. I had a hard time finishing it the first time I read the book nine years ago, but her voice gives a weight and seriousness that weighs me into the story. “The Wheel of Time turns, and Ages come and pass, leaving memories that become legend…”

Flavors: Amaretto, Cherry, Citrus, Cream, Dark Chocolate, Malt, Peach, Scotch, Smooth, Vanilla

CrowKettle

I feel like I should do a reread of Wheel of Time for the new show but the task is so daunting..

Also, this tea was not on my radar but it is now!

Daylon R Thomas

My first note is actually 5 years old, and it’s one of my personal favorite on-smoked Lapsang Blacks. Alistair only carries this one seasonally, and it’s expensive, but I personally liked this one more than even some Wuyi Origin ones.

Courtney

My partner binged the show all weekend and we just picked up the first two books today!

Daylon R Thomas

What do you guys think about the books and the TV series so far?

Courtney

I’ve been working sadly, but Lex loved the show! She wasn’t sure at the start, but by the end she was hooked!

CrowKettle

I haven’t started the TV series yet but everyone I’ve heard from has enjoyed it so far! Looking forward to picking it up when things get less busy on my end.

The books, while not perfect(repetitive in places, Nynaeve’s meme-worthy braid pulling, etc.),were a great extended comfort read. I never knew the pain of waiting for each book to come out or being annoyed with how little ground was covered in various volumes though, since I read them as a completed series in 2013-2014. They were fun!

Login or sign up to leave a comment.