Tie Guan Yin Master Grade

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Perfume
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Tea Pet
Average preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec 5 g 4 oz / 118 ml

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5 Tasting Notes View all

  • “Tie Guan Yin Master Grade Oolong Tea from Yezi Tea is an Oolong from the famed tea growing region of the Nanhu Mountain Range. To brew this beauty I decided to go all out, sitting outside on a warm...” Read full tasting note
    97
    SoggyEnderman 325 tasting notes
  • “This is one seriously floral oolong. It’s very light, very sweet, almost entirely devoid of savory notes. It’s got that unidentifiable jasmine-but-not-jasmine thing going on, floral-wise—I shared...” Read full tasting note
    76
    greenteafairy 198 tasting notes
  • “These thick leathery leaves have a very clean and smooth taste to them. I'm picking up granny smith apple and clementine notes mixed with warm cream, quickly changing to a honeysuckle finish that...” Read full tasting note
    87
    Pureleaf 133 tasting notes
  • “Light oolong that has a strong floral aroma. If you like floral oolongs, this is the tea for you. It has a strong floral taste to match its aroma. It is smooth and has the right amount of...” Read full tasting note
    80
    A-House 78 tasting notes

From Yezi Tea

This premium Iron Bodhisattva has a deep yellow color, notes of rice with a distinct fragrance of orchids, and a refreshing kick you might otherwise only get from a bubbling brook in the Himalayas; it evokes a cool-mountain-air feeling reminiscent of spring, no matter what time of year it is.

Use: 5-6 grams or 1-2 tsp. of tea
Water amount: 1 gram of tea / 30ml of water or 1 tsp. of tea / 3 oz. of water
Temperature: 90-95 °C or 194-203 °F
Brew: 6-7 times
First brew: 45 seconds
Subsequent brews: Add 10 seconds

About Yezi Tea View company

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5 Tasting Notes

97
325 tasting notes

Tie Guan Yin Master Grade Oolong Tea from Yezi Tea is an Oolong from the famed tea growing region of the Nanhu Mountain Range. To brew this beauty I decided to go all out, sitting outside on a warm sunny day with my Yixing pot, my vintage Chinese tea bowl, and all my fancy Gong Fu tools. I don’t use my Yixing nearly as often as I would like to, something I plan on rectifying in the future. The aroma of this Tie Guan Yin is nothing short of heavenly, very floral and sweet. I mainly notice orchids and honeysuckles but for an extra treat I can pick out the aroma of scuppernongs. As an afterthought there is a tiny wisp of green, similar to spring time vegetation and an even more scant ghost of honey. This tea’s aroma very much so embodies ideal of Spring.

I was very fortunate to get multiple awesome steeps out of this tea, so I will start with the first soaking of the leaves. The aroma of the brewed leaves is slightly nutty with strong floral notes. There is also a tiny hint of a roasted aroma in the leaves. The liquid is mostly floral, primarily orchid, but there is also a slight hint of vegetal, like spinach. The taste is very smooth and mild! Intensely floral like honeysuckles or possibly lilacs. The tea tastes very clean and fresh, just like a tiny bit of spring time in my mouth. The aftertaste is one of orchids.

The second steep brings in more of a roasted aroma to leaves and a stronger floral aroma to the liquid. The taste of the tea brings in more of a green, vegetal tone. Somehow the tea seems cleaner, like it purifies the water. It reminds me of fresh spring water with a tiny taste of the moss growing near it. Having drank from a mountain spring (it was significantly colder than hot tea) the similarity is surprising.

The third steep brings in even more of a roasted chestnut aroma and it is very heady. The liquid has the aroma of orchids, but instead of being freshly opened these are orchids that have been sitting in the sun for hours and start to have that old flower sickly sweetness. The taste is intense! Best steep of the set, it manages to be intense but still mild (ah the magic of Oolongs) the flavor is mildly roasted chestnut at first and then it fills your mouth with intense orchid. The aftertaste is mineral-like, bringing in the mountain spring imagery from the previous steep.

The fourth and final steep, I notice that the leaves have lost most their aroma but what is left is sweet and evocative of honeysuckle. The taste is sweet and floral bringing out the honeysuckle notes that were in the aroma. There is also a slight mid taste of roasted chestnut and then lastly an aftertaste of mineral spring water. This tea was fascinating and very enjoyable, it was like I journeyed through early Spring with the first steep and traveled through to Midsummer. I recommend seeking this tea out if you want a very different experience with each steep.

For blog and photos: http://ramblingbutterflythoughts.blogspot.com/2013/10/yezi-tea-tie-guan-yin-master-grade.html

Nicole

Okay. I had to look up “scuppernong.” Sounds like an interesting tea.

Amanda 'SoggyEnderman' Wilson

Scuppernongs are so good! I grew up eating them and sadly they have not seemed to leave the South, I miss them.

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76
198 tasting notes

This is one seriously floral oolong. It’s very light, very sweet, almost entirely devoid of savory notes. It’s got that unidentifiable jasmine-but-not-jasmine thing going on, floral-wise—I shared this sample with my mom, and she said the floral note (which I’ve gotten in lots of other green oolongs, although never quite to this extent) is honeysuckle, so there you go. Although I’m generally all for floral, I’m finding it a bit much here. I’m used to TGYs being more savory and having a bit more depth, and I do prefer them that way.

In a shocking break from my usual, I did NOT brew this one western style—I actually followed Yezi’s instructions. It’s nice to brew like this once in a (very long) while I suppose, but mostly I was reminded of why I do prefer western style. I just really like settling in with a large (or even mid-sized) cup of tea and relaxing; I don’t find all the measuring and timing and general activity enjoyable. Anyway, this time I did four steeps, and I can’t say I noticed a ton of difference from steep to steep. I feel bad for not loving this tea, but I just didn’t. I can tell the quality is high, though, and I can see someone with different oolong preferences really enjoying it. Thanks for the sample, Nicole_Martin!

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87
133 tasting notes

These thick leathery leaves have a very clean and smooth taste to them. I’m picking up granny smith apple and clementine notes mixed with warm cream, quickly changing to a honeysuckle finish that lingers.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 0 min, 15 sec

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80
78 tasting notes

Light oolong that has a strong floral aroma. If you like floral oolongs, this is the tea for you. It has a strong floral taste to match its aroma. It is smooth and has the right amount of sweetness, but it is a little too floral for my taste.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C

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97
222 tasting notes

My first tie guan yin! Very floral and perfumey. Loved it <3

Followed the steeping time on the website and started with 45 seconds and worked up. By the 3rd infusion, I thinking it would haven been better to add 15 or 20 seconds rather than 10, but now at least I know for next time :)

Flavors: Perfume

Preparation
5 g 4 OZ / 118 ML

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