Dong Ding Winter Peak Oolong Tea

Tea type
Oolong Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Artichoke, Camphor, Clove, Floral, Honey, Sweet, Vegetal, Butter, Flowers
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by Tea Pet
Average preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 1 min, 45 sec 5 g 5 oz / 150 ml

Available from 1 seller.

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9 Tasting Notes View all

  • “So... buttery.... :) I tend to go for roasted Dong Ding's more than green. I had completely forgotten that I had this tea in my cabinet. It does not disappoint. It's so light, buttery, creamy,...” Read full tasting note
    TeaPet 612 tasting notes
  • “As a part of my resolve to branch out and explore oolong tea, I made a purchase from Yezi for this lovely Dong Ding. (I also ordered their Pouchong as well and made a pot of it at the same time to...” Read full tasting note
    100
    Charissa 70 tasting notes
  • “Free sample of 5gm, I used a 130 gaiwan and water temperature a little lower than recommended and also steeped initially for shorter times. Dry leaf aroma is that typical green oolong scent but its...” Read full tasting note
    80
    BigDaddy 74 tasting notes
  • “I think it's been a while since I've had a Taiwanese oolong. I'd almost forgotten how delicate they were! Gongfu style brewing with a mason jar, strainer, and mug, since I'm too lazy to pull out my...” Read full tasting note
    74
    Argentum 124 tasting notes

From Yezi Tea

This light tea hails from the town of Logu nestled among the mountains of Nantou County in Taiwan. The tea trees in this part of Taiwan were first transplanted from the famous Wuyi Mountains in 1885. Yezi’s Dong Ding Oolong is brought to you by tea farmer Gao Xiu Chen, who takes great pride in bringing all-natural Dong Ding Oolong to the people of Taiwan and, indeed, the rest of the world.

The flavor of Dong Ding Oolong is pure and light with sugarcane sweetness balanced by a hint of bitterness. A perfect confluence of yin and yang, if you will—after one sip of this pure yellow brew, you’ll understand. The loose-leaf tea’s exquisite fragrance evokes visions of the first blossoms of gardenia and often compels the most pragmatic person to lapse into poetry. Its light taste and sublime aura make Dong Ding Oolong ideal for transitioning to a period of mindful activity after an afternoon meal.

About Yezi Tea View company

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9 Tasting Notes

612 tasting notes

So… buttery…. :)

I tend to go for roasted Dong Ding’s more than green. I had completely forgotten that I had this tea in my cabinet. It does not disappoint. It’s so light, buttery, creamy, and floral. The mouth-feel is just ridiculous. The mouth-feel alone is worth drinking this tea. I feel like I’m cheating on something. Can something be scandalously buttery? Is that a term I can use? Haha! Well, the mouth-feel is scandalously buttery in the best way.

Edit: Looking at my last tasting note for this… This tea has definitely gotten better now that it has settled a bit more. :)

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100
70 tasting notes

As a part of my resolve to branch out and explore oolong tea, I made a purchase from Yezi for this lovely Dong Ding. (I also ordered their Pouchong as well and made a pot of it at the same time to compare to this—-review coming soon). This tea was absolutely wonderful—made my taste buds dance! I steeped this in my little glass teapot for 4 minutes, and the color of the liquor was a beautiful gold, the aroma sweet and buttery. The taste was phenomenal: sweet, slightly floral (orchid?) slightly buttery—and overall it was lively, lingering, and lovely! It was very faintly reminiscent of the milk oolong I have from Gong Fu Tea, only less creamy/buttery and with the added floral notes. Aaaahhhh truly a delight in every sense!
I steeped the leaves again, this time for 5 minutes, and could definitely taste more of floral aspects. It was also creamy, a little more vegetal, and dry on the tongue, but not at all unpleasant.
This is a definite LOVE. I will have to order this again. It is such a pleasing and complex tea, so fresh and tasty, you can just tell it is of very exceptional quality. This is truly happiness in a cup!

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 6 OZ / 177 ML

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80
74 tasting notes

Free sample of 5gm, I used a 130 gaiwan and water temperature a little lower than recommended and also steeped initially for shorter times. Dry leaf aroma is that typical green oolong scent but its somewhat muted in this leaf. The aroma of the wet leaf is more pronounced and again typical. The first steep brought a perfect picture of me eating puffed rice as a kid. I added 5 seconds to each steep and the third was the best of the bunch. Now the puffed rice had the sugar on it and the was more body to this light tea. The also was a hint of pine nut that I remembered from a dragonwell I tasted previously. An average tea good for those who like an unassertive tea.

Preparation
180 °F / 82 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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74
124 tasting notes

I think it’s been a while since I’ve had a Taiwanese oolong. I’d almost forgotten how delicate they were! Gongfu style brewing with a mason jar, strainer, and mug, since I’m too lazy to pull out my yixing (which I’ve sort of been using for black teas, anyway).

Very light and smooth, with almost no astringency. Has a slightly creamy or buttery mouthfeel. Sort of like velvet? I should probably brush up on my texture descriptors. Sweet, a tiny bit vegetal, also with a slight floral hint. Sort of reminds me of a mix of tieguanyin and jin xuan oolongs, but it’s been a while since I’ve had a tieguanyin so I can’t be certain.

Gosh, I need to get back to drinking more oolongs! But I should probably deal with my exploding tea trunk, first…

(Sample sipdown!)

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67
53 tasting notes

Very interesting tea. Writing this drinking the second steeping, which is very similar to the first. The aroma of both is excellent, with a very smooth, wet, warm, organic character, and sets very high expectations for the tea. The flavor is something I’m not sure I’ve experienced before. It’s got an incredibly silky, almost oily mouthfeel, and with no bitterness it delivers a complex flavor profile that’s initially subtle, but develops through several layers that I’m not quite sure how to describe. It’s very slightly vegetal, but in such a tamed way that it’s almost like drinking steamed cauliflower. This is a totally new tea experience for me. Not sure if I’ll buy, but I’ll remember it.

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 2 min, 30 sec

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85
152 tasting notes

Well, this confounded my expectations. I have never had an unroasted Dong Ding, so this is a new experience to me.

The first steeping was light with hints of sweet soft floral. By the second the infusion color is a light yellow-green with a very generous buttery flavor and mouthfeel and a finish of floral and sweet vegetal flavors. A few infusions in I’m reminded a bit of a Tie Guanyin. There are the nice hearty leafy qualities with just hints of floral and spice. In later steepings the tea is more mellow and buttery with just dull sweetness, but it is good for many infusions. I’m on 6 and and though there is a bit of a mineral flavor emerging, it is still overall good to drink. By infusion 8 the bitter/mineral quality seemed to back off again and the cup is mostly sweet, if not a bit weak. I’m doing a 9th infusion before I stop (can you tell yet that I’m brewing Gongfu style?). Wow! On the 9th infusion the flavor changed completely and now it tastes like artichoke! Surprising! There’s a little lingering sweetness, and as it cools I’m getting more of the clove/camphor notes from before. Okay, maybe one more won’t hurt. 10’s a good stopping point. Oh yeah, now that I’m trying it, it’s quite interesting. Really different from where this tea started out. Still buttery with some nice artichoke and cream notes.

While I must confess I find myself more drawn to the roasted type of Dong Ding, this unroasted version is unique and fun to enjoy. It really gives you a peek at what nuances in the tea leaves develop into the qualities you’d find in a roasted Dong Ding when it is roasted.

Flavors: Artichoke, Camphor, Clove, Floral, Honey, Sweet, Vegetal

Preparation
195 °F / 90 °C 0 min, 30 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 100 ML

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248 tasting notes

Origin: Logu, Nantou Co.; Taiwan
dong ding (Dong Ding) = mountainous oolong producing area of Nantou county, Taiwan, literally Frozen Summit (冻顶 or 凍頂)
Dry Leaf: Buttery, daffodil-scented yellowish-green tightly rolled pellets on stems.
Method: 4oz Porcelain Gong Fu pot 5grams tea 3oz water 200F No rinse
45 seconds first steeping then 55 seconds for the second steeping
Wet Leaf: Mostly 2 leaves on a stem. Honey and daffodil-scented. Leaves dark forest green now.
Liquor: Light spring green color, scent of the daffodil and honey.
Flavor: First infusion – Buttery flavor and mouthfeel. Not too floral in flavor, it is more on the nose—which is perfect.
Second infusion brought a touch of balancing bitter (but not harsh) and the liquor is a darker spring green color. Very good floral Oolong.

Flavors: Butter, Flowers

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 45 sec 5 g 3 OZ / 88 ML

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77
260 tasting notes

This had a very green aroma and flavor, and while I liked it, I didn’t pick up on any special scents or tastes. It just tasted like a slightly sweet greenish tea.

Absolutely drinkable, but there are several teas from a yezi that I like better, so I’ll be sticking with those.

Edit 5/19/14 – I made this grandpa style at work last week and I thought it was especially well suited to this method. The tea tasted mild and pleasant, but never became bitter. I got 3-4 steepings out of about 3/4 tsp. of tea in a 10 oz. mug. I’m adjusting my rating because I was very happy with the result.

Preparation
205 °F / 96 °C 4 min, 0 sec 1 tsp 8 OZ / 236 ML

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