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2009 Bu Lang Shan Yun

Tea type
Pu-erh Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
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Caffeine
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Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by the_skua
Average preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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3 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This tea is just downright perplexing to me. I’m having trouble gathering my thoughts about it. The dry leaf, rinse, and first steep aromas are all quiet, sullen, and distant, pushing through a...” Read full tasting note
    18
    the_skua 207 tasting notes
  • “http://jakubtomek.blogspot.com/2011/09/2009-ys-bu-lang-shan-yun.html It's an interesting tea. I believe that shu lovers will like it mostly. I'm not one of them, therefore this tea is...” Read full tasting note
    67
    jakubtomek 15 tasting notes

From Yunnan Sourcing

Bu Lang Shan Yun (布朗山韵 aka Rhyme of Bu Lang Mountain) is the first tea created under the new Yunnan Sourcing / Rui Cao Xiang label. This label is a co-project between Yunnan Sourcing “Yun Zhi Yuan” (云之源) and a Korean counter-part “Rui Cao Xiang” (瑞草香). During their extensive travels and mao cha tastings in Banna during the Spring of 2009 they came across this 2006 Autumn mao cha from the village of Man Nong (曼弄寨), near to He Kai (贺开) about 20km north of Ban Zhang(班章). The tea is entirely wild arbor and features large leaves, sturdy with thick veins. The tea is typically Bu Lang but has mellowed significantly due to its storage as un-compresssed mao cha in hot and humid Banna. It brews a deep golden liquor which is thick and soothing with plenty of sweetness but not without some of the at Bu Lang rich texture that stimulates and satisifies! This tea was compressed in a small tea factory near Jing Hong where stone presses were used. Low temperature “baking” was used to dry these cakes after the compression process thus preserving their integrity! In total just 200 kilograms of this tea has been produced

Net Weight: 357 grams per cake
Compression date: June 4th, 2009
Harvest time: October 2006
Harvest Area: Man Nong village of Bu Lang mountains, Menghai county
Total Production amount: 554 cakes

About Yunnan Sourcing View company

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3 Tasting Notes

18
207 tasting notes

This tea is just downright perplexing to me. I’m having trouble gathering my thoughts about it. The dry leaf, rinse, and first steep aromas are all quiet, sullen, and distant, pushing through a hint of spice, mushroom, and moss. Flavor? Flavor? I’m looking for it. I’m searching.

In the next gaiwan over, I’ve got the session of Wu Liang from yesterday. I give it a brief reinvigorating rinse to bring it back up to temperature and then pull off a minute-long 12th steep. I felt embarrassed for the Bu Lang cake when I put my nose to the cup of Wu Liang and then loudly slurped a big sip; it was still loaded with flavor, texture, bitterness and aroma.

Moving back to the tea at hand, crickets are chirping. As it opens, it releases a distinct and surprising, wet, moldy basement on me. Aside from some slight date sugar and mulling spice character, I have little positive to say about this tea. It ends parching in an odd cottony sensation. This tea gave me a weird, bad headache.

Full blog post: http://tea.theskua.com/?p=329

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67
15 tasting notes

http://jakubtomek.blogspot.com/2011/09/2009-ys-bu-lang-shan-yun.html

It’s an interesting tea. I believe that shu lovers will like it mostly. I’m not one of them, therefore this tea is interesting rather than perfect for me.

Preparation
200 °F / 93 °C 0 min, 30 sec

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