Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

Organic Uji Gyokuro Gokou

Tea type
Green Tea
Ingredients
Not available
Flavors
Not available
Sold in
Not available
Caffeine
Not available
Certification
Not available
Edit tea info Last updated by the_skua
Average preparation
145 °F / 62 °C 2 min, 30 sec

Currently unavailable

We don't know when or if this item will be available.

From Our Community

1 Image

2 Want it Want it

3 Own it Own it

4 Tasting Notes View all

  • “This tea came highly recommended, but did not stack up to traditional teas. If I were to rate this strictly against other organic Japanese teas, I would give it very good marks. It does not...” Read full tasting note
    53
    000 3 tasting notes
  • “Lovely! I brewed this up in my brand-spanking-new little houhin that I acquired through Yuuki-cha. I was SO EXCITED to brew this up! My first gyokuro! I'll admit that 000 is correct in the...” Read full tasting note
    86
    smartkitty 32 tasting notes
  • “After being disappointed with some recent organic Japanese green tea purchases, I'm really enjoying this organic gyokuro. From the moment I opened the pouch, I knew this tea was going to be good. ...” Read full tasting note
    76
    luckyme 12 tasting notes
  • “I've brewed this two times now, using two of the different suggested methods. Both produced nice tea. This is a briny gyokuro, for sure. I love the sea-fresh oyster-liquor aroma and first taste...” Read full tasting note
    86
    the_skua 207 tasting notes

From Yuuki-cha

A first harvest organic gyokuro from a small organic tea garden in Uji. It is made exclusively from the tea bush varietal known as Gokou. Rich and sweet flavored!

About Yuuki-cha View company

Company description not available.

4 Tasting Notes

53
3 tasting notes

This tea came highly recommended, but did not stack up to traditional teas.

If I were to rate this strictly against other organic Japanese teas, I would give it very good marks. It does not have the biting “oh my goodness, this tea is going to strip the enamel from my teeth” flavor and astringency that other organic Japanese greens often have, but it does not have sufficient body or character to come anywhere near a traditional Japanese gyokuro.

The leaf in the bag has the typical modern organic tea presentation of a dry and broken leaf with excessive twigs and dust. The twigs are represented by the lighter yellow stringy bits (which are not present in true gyokuro) and the dust should be obvious to all. The smell in the bag is pleasantly sweet, but has no depth.

When placed into the warmed pot the aroma does not increase. I steeped this tea both by the method prescribed and by my own cold and warm methods in a 4oz gyokuro pot. On all occasions the tea liquor was very green, but not very aromatic. The flavor was sweet yet somewhat insipid and lacking the character indicative of the varietal for which this tea is named: Gokou. By the third steep there was no flavor at all, but the liquor was still a pleasant shade of green.

The steeped leaf of a true gyokuro should be identifiable as a mostly whole leaf and tender, like spinach, and have no chewy bits. The steeped leaf of this tea was broken. The layer of leaf between the cuticles was mashed up, torn and separated. What there was of the leaf was papery and the bits of stem were unpleasant to chew.

If you are looking for organic Japanese tea, this seems like it may be the best you can find at the moment. If you are looking for good Japanese tea, there are much better, but they are hard to find.

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 3 min, 0 sec
Shinobi_cha

Dear Pavilion Tea,
I was on your website and read about White Snow brewing, but I wasn’t exactly sure how it worked. Do you think you could write it up? After reading the story, I really wanted to try it!

GEORGEARMANO

Yes, I’ve found the same thing (a lot of dust and broken up pieces in both asamushi and fukamushi senchas sold by Yuukicha. Where do you buy your tea?

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

86
32 tasting notes

Lovely!

I brewed this up in my brand-spanking-new little houhin that I acquired through Yuuki-cha. I was SO EXCITED to brew this up! My first gyokuro!

I’ll admit that 000 is correct in the assertion that the leaves are a total mess. They look like they’ve been through a wood-chipper. Even so, the dry leaf smells gorgeously kelpy. Seaweed in a way I like. I have trouble articulating where the line between “good” and “bad” seaweed goes – the best I can do is say that “bad” seaweed is the taste/smell you get in cheaper sushis, kinda overpowering and kinda fishy too. (Different than the fish “fishy”, if you know what I mean.) Anyway. None of that here. It’s GOOD seaweed.

I’ll admit I didn’t brew this in the ideal conditions. The result was a slightly more astringent tea than should have been, though I can still see beautiful potential. I used two teaspoons for my houhin – which holds about 5.5 oz to a reasonable water level. (7oz to the rim, but then it would be one hot mess.) The instructions enclosed with the shipment said to brew a strong gyokuro at 105F for 3 minutes. I couldn’t wait for the water to cool any longer and ended up doing it at 130~F.

The liquor turned out a BEAUTIFUL light jade green. It should have been clear, but there was a lot of leaf debris getting through the houhin’s ceramic filter. Unless I get a pitcher or serve it in a mug, not sure I can use my trusty extra-fine strainer with my tiny little teacups. Even so, I’m sure tea dust would still get through.

The smell of the brewed tea is gorgeous. A vegetal ocean breeze, and just as soothing. It tasted like it smelled – savoury goodness melting into a vivid vegetal sweetness. Beautifully thick flavours, super satisfying! I got 4 good steeps out of it, each one grassier than the last. Unfortunately, the delicious umami note didn’t really carry over to the other steeps, though it’s possible that it’s because I used hotter water than I should have the first time. Definitely a bit too astringent if your water is too hot, treat this tea with care!

Right now I’m having the fifth and last steep, which I cold-brewed over night just to see what I’d get. Grassy water with a hint of kelpy sweetness. One too far!

Can’t wait to try this again, and get it right.

Preparation
140 °F / 60 °C 3 min, 0 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

76
12 tasting notes

After being disappointed with some recent organic Japanese green tea purchases, I’m really enjoying this organic gyokuro.

From the moment I opened the pouch, I knew this tea was going to be good. The tea leaves had a exquisite aroma that was fresh, grassy, and mildly earthy all at the same time. Not surprising considering the production date was late May 2013 and I received the tea just a few months later.

However I was disappointed the first few times I brewed this tea. I followed the enclosed instructions and steeped for 60 to 75 seconds at 140 F. This resulted in a very weak brew that basically tasted like hot water. So I reverted back to my standard method for gyokuro: 1 heaping teaspoon per 6 oz of water @ 160 F. The result was a pleasantly grassy brew with notes of seaweed and spinach balanced with a light sweetness. First infusion yielded a pale yellowish green liquor. Second infusion was a stunning almost neon green and the color of the third was similar to the first. The flavor of the second infusion is similar to the first, distinctly vegetal but without the thick mouthfeel. Third infusion is similar to sencha. My temperature/times for each infusion:

1st: 160 F for about 65 seconds
2nd: 160 F for 35-40 seconds
3rd: 170 F for 90 seconds

Preparation
160 °F / 71 °C 1 min, 0 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

86
207 tasting notes

I’ve brewed this two times now, using two of the different suggested methods. Both produced nice tea. This is a briny gyokuro, for sure. I love the sea-fresh oyster-liquor aroma and first taste that hits hard. Really salty. The umami picks up but is immediately counterbalanced by a spinach-like, chlorophyll-heavy sweetness. It’s really balanced and really delicious. The first brew of this tea is insanely viscous. It’s like sweet kelp candy coating the tongue. Later infusions develop a grassy astringency that plays nicely with the glutamate-infused sweetness. In the very end, a whisper of tangerine rind. Stunningly complex tea.

Preparation
3 min, 0 sec

Login or sign up to leave a comment.