Hide

Welcome to Steepster, an online tea community.

Write a tea journal, see what others are drinking and get recommendations from people you trust. or Learn More

65
drank Corn Tea by Dong Suh
411 tasting notes

I saw this in the local Asian grocery store and bought it, pretty much just so I could try it and log it here.

This tea takes me down memory lane. Set the way-back machine for longer-than-I’d-like-to-admit-ago. The summer of my junior year of college everyone I went to school with was getting an internship somewhere. And I had NO idea what I wanted to do. I didn’t want to just go home and spend the summer doing odd jobs, but I didn’t have a clue where I wanted to go and work.

I ended up getting bored one night and reading the endnotes in my personal organizer/calendar. It was one my mother had bought me, called WeMoon. And something caught my eye – they took interns! The calendar was produced out of a women’s commune in Oregon, near Portland. I’m not a particular radical anything, but when given the chance to live on a commune? How could I pass this up? It was such a different experience from pretty much anything else I’d ever experienced that I remember much of it very clearly.

One particular memory, relevant to the issue at hand is of this: one of the women who visited boiled some veggies for dinner, then poured the cooking water into a glass to drink later. When I looked at her funny, she said it helped increase the amount of vitamins you got from your food. It struck me as odd, but hey – do what you want.

So how does this relate to tea? This corn tea? It’s really the essence of roasted corn in a glass. Like you took a roasted ear fresh off the grill and managed to distill it into a glass. The smell is just like smelling corn boil on your stovetop. Or popcorn from two rooms away.
The taste is a naturally sweet corn flavor. It’s a little jarring to get it from a cup of warm liquid rather than gnawing on an ear, but it’s good.

This won’t become one of my staples, because when I’m drinking something warm and wet, I tend to want it tea flavored rather than vegetable flavored. But this was a really interesting experience, and a wonderful way to be reminded of that summer in Oregon.

Preparation
Boiling 7 min, 45 sec
zeitfliesst

Wow, I never thought I would see this reviewed on Steepster. I think most Koreans would have had this at least once in their lifetime. I remember this tea being in huge steel kettles at home and I would drink it cold just like water. Also try 보리차 which translates as barley tea I guess.

Doulton

What an intriguing note. It sounds like what they might call “pot likker” in the South.

SoccerMom

Doulton, Yes I was thinking the same. We would definently call that put liquor!!

SoccerMom

Pot liquor

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Comments

zeitfliesst

Wow, I never thought I would see this reviewed on Steepster. I think most Koreans would have had this at least once in their lifetime. I remember this tea being in huge steel kettles at home and I would drink it cold just like water. Also try 보리차 which translates as barley tea I guess.

Doulton

What an intriguing note. It sounds like what they might call “pot likker” in the South.

SoccerMom

Doulton, Yes I was thinking the same. We would definently call that put liquor!!

SoccerMom

Pot liquor

Login or sign up to leave a comment.

Profile

Bio

I’ve got a lot of interests: sushi, science fiction/fantasy, medieval recreation, cooking (specifically medieval cooking), reading, British science fiction (Doctor Who!), hand sewing and now TEA!!

My favorites tend to be oolongs and flavored black teas. I like highly flavored teas more than delicate ones. Rooibos tends to taste like dirt to me, and hibiscus is very sour to my palate. But I’m always up to try all sorts of things, and will often find things that I really like which I thought I’d hate.

Location

Kansas City

Following These People