93

I’m starting to pull out all the good stuff from storage, and this was on the list. I’m going to be getting a little more of this, so I decided to try this, so I know what I’ll be getting. The leaves are massive, dark, and I can spot some lengthy stems. They carry a dry wood and some spicy aroma. I warmed up my jianshui and placed them inside. I gave the pot a shake and took in this unique aroma. The scent was very light and subtle. I was picking up some slight fruit mixed with tobacco. The background scents were of decayed wood and some peat moss. The aromas were so subtle that I had to sit for a bit and try to pick them up. I washed the leaves once and prepared for brewing. The steeped leaves gave off some much more prominent notes of tobacco, leather, fruit, and some cherry wood. The first taste was intense, yet it was also incredibly light bodied. The initial sip was syrupy sweet and juicy with some underlying oak tone. The brew gave a gummy feeling in the mouth. The brew develops to a maple candy succulency (east coast people and Canadians might know about these candies). The aftertaste consists of a brown sugar sweetness. I detected no astringency in the brew, and I only tasted a very slight bitterness. I pushed the brew after a little bit to try and extract some more intense flavors. The brew was a nice bright orange, and I was getting more leather tastes in the later steeping sessions. The sweet tones faded for most of the session and were replaced by maple wood and leather. The taste also drift towards the pleasant sour side. However, in the final steeping session, the brew came back with a sugarcane sweetness mixed with the maple wood. The huigan is very delayed, but is extremely thick. The back of my throat had nice maple syrup taste that followed after the session was finished. The leaves are mostly intact and massive. The qi is not all that powerful, but it is intensely warming. I had to change out of my sweater in the middle of session, for I began to feel like a furnace. This is a very nice tea, but isn’t my favorite offering from YGH. I think this needs a little more storage, but it’s still really tasty.

https://www.instagram.com/p/-ojCjWzGQf/?taken-by=haveteawilltravel

Flavors: Brown Sugar, Cherry Wood, Decayed wood, Drying, Leather, Maple, Peat Moss, Pleasantly Sour, Sugarcane

Preparation
Boiling 0 min, 15 sec 7 g 3 OZ / 100 ML
jschergen

Nice review. I find this one to be on the heavier side compared with the Yiwu Chawang. Easier to get bitter, so I understand the comments on needing a little more time.

Haveteawilltravel

I thought the Yiwu had a thicker mouthfeel than this. I’ll be revisiting it in later December.

jschergen

Interesting.

I did a head to head with both together with a friend who was considering buying. The Yiwu Chawang started out a bit stronger, but I found the TsangLiu was better from the 5th or so steep onwards. This is a 6 mountain, cross-seasonal blend so there’s probably a fair deal of variance since everything is close to a whole leaf.

Haveteawilltravel

Ah okay. I’d agree with longevity. The Yiwu began more punchy and thicker, but it did die relatively quickly. I’ve brewed the Tsang for quite some time and had a consistent flavor throughout.

mrmopar

Glad I got this one. Now if I can stay out of it a while….

Haveteawilltravel

My solution is to buy tea and hopefully you’ll “forget” about this…

curlygc

I was going back and forth between this one and the Yiwu, and finally just had to do a side by side comparison so I could make a decision. It’s interesting to me that most folks think the Tsang is heavier than the Yiwi; to me it’s the opposite. I like them both but much prefer the Tsang. Personal preference I guess.

Haveteawilltravel

Personally, I prefer the Yiwu. The Yiwu has a much more intense flavor and huigan with a fuller body. However, both are really good, and I think this is meant for a longer session.

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Comments

jschergen

Nice review. I find this one to be on the heavier side compared with the Yiwu Chawang. Easier to get bitter, so I understand the comments on needing a little more time.

Haveteawilltravel

I thought the Yiwu had a thicker mouthfeel than this. I’ll be revisiting it in later December.

jschergen

Interesting.

I did a head to head with both together with a friend who was considering buying. The Yiwu Chawang started out a bit stronger, but I found the TsangLiu was better from the 5th or so steep onwards. This is a 6 mountain, cross-seasonal blend so there’s probably a fair deal of variance since everything is close to a whole leaf.

Haveteawilltravel

Ah okay. I’d agree with longevity. The Yiwu began more punchy and thicker, but it did die relatively quickly. I’ve brewed the Tsang for quite some time and had a consistent flavor throughout.

mrmopar

Glad I got this one. Now if I can stay out of it a while….

Haveteawilltravel

My solution is to buy tea and hopefully you’ll “forget” about this…

curlygc

I was going back and forth between this one and the Yiwu, and finally just had to do a side by side comparison so I could make a decision. It’s interesting to me that most folks think the Tsang is heavier than the Yiwi; to me it’s the opposite. I like them both but much prefer the Tsang. Personal preference I guess.

Haveteawilltravel

Personally, I prefer the Yiwu. The Yiwu has a much more intense flavor and huigan with a fuller body. However, both are really good, and I think this is meant for a longer session.

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Bio

Young and experienced Tea consumer. I’m continuously learning and developing knowledge about tea. If I have learned anything at all from the world of tea it is that I do not know anything about the world of tea. I enjoy good tea, and I try to acquire the best of the best. I usually brew gongfu but I’ve been known from time to time to resort back to western brewing.

I have an Instagram (haveteawilltravel), and I am proud of my photographs. I use my pictures in my reviews,and I hope that they aid in portraying the beauty of tea and teaware.

https://www.instagram.com/haveteawilltravel/?hl=en

Tea Rating System:
I rate my teas based on the category they fall into (Puer, Red, Oolong, Darjeeing, Flushes, Yancha… etc.)
This means that I will rate a Oolong based on how it stands up as a quality Oolong. I try not to compare teas, rather I work to evaluate them on their craftsmanship, harvest, processing, and qi.

I am most strict with Shou and Sheng Puerh, only because of the vast expanse of various experiences, such as; region, vintage, production, processing, etc.

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